Razie Mah

Biography

See website for bio.

Smashwords Interview

What about An Archaeology of the Fall?
This work is both a story and an academic treatise. It is not for the faint of heart or mind. It upends familiar perspectives in both science and religion. The first movement, A, presents the gambit, a hypothesis explaining why our current Lebenswelt (living world) is not the Lebenswelt that we evolved in. The interlude, B, presents a university experience, a close reading of a text where presuppositions get all turned round. Most college students pass through four years of college without this experience. The third movement, A', returns to the gambit, but now within the active imagination. The early stories in Genesis are re-enacted on the celestial earth. By the time it is over, the reader will view both human evolution and the Genesis text in a new postmodern light. The beginning writes the end.
What about The First Singularity and Its Fairy Tale Trace?
This essay summarizes the central hypothesis in "An Archaeology of the Fall". The question it addresses is: Why civilization? Another way to put that is: Have humans passed through a singularity such that our current Lebenswelt (life world) is not the same as the Lebenswelt that we evolved in? The answer is yes. The potentiating factor is presented. This essay is ideal for classes on both human evolution and the Book of Genesis in the Bible. This essay should be contrasted with William Stone's article, "Adam and Modern Science", appearing in "Adam, the Fall and Original Sin" (2014: Baker Academic).
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Where to find Razie Mah online

Where to buy in print

Series

Phenomenology and the Positivist Intellect
At the start of the 17th century, science is conceived when mechanical philosophers define a positivist intellect, a cogito with an unquenchable will to know. Two hundred years later, the distinction between a natural noumenon (the thing itself) and its phenomena (its observable and measurable facets) is codified as a slogan. A noumenon cannot be objectified as its phenomena. Hands-on scientists investigate phenomena. Visionary scientists virtually situate hands-on science by elevating models into laws, aiming to convert laws into things themselves. In the early 20th century, Edmund Husserl counters visionary science. He fashions a method to return to the noumenon, by asking phenomena, "What do you want me to recognize as the thing itself?" Phenomenological reduction elucidates what the noumenon (of a natural science) must be. This series offers commentaries that lead the reader further into the realities that phenomenology, visionary science and the postivist intellect engender. The relationships must be visualized. Peircean diagrams interweave with text. For a list of works in the series, please consult the blog for May 03, 2022 at www.raziemah.com.
Considerations of Jacques Maritain, John Deely and Thomistic Approaches to the Questions of These Times
Two models are used to appreciate now-forgotten paths stretching from Baroque scholastics to the present day. These models are the triadic structure of judgment and the category-based nested form. Two recent intellects stand out. One is Jacques Maritain. Born in France, he comes to North America around the time of the second world war. He is keenly interested in how to recover a scholastic approach within this world of modern science. Another is John Deely, whose recent death marks the end of a long career as both a Thomist and a semiotician. Deely confronts the philosophers of the day in a very entertaining manner. This series contains comments on articles from journals such as the American Catholic Philosophical Association, Faith and Philosophy, as well as books, including Daniel Novotny's excellent works on the Baroque scholastics. This series is not a course. It is a place to sample ideas. I encourage readers to consider both the original and the comments. They may be read in tandem or in sequence.
A Course on Evolution and Thomism
This course is structured to appreciate the transformative potential of Peircean approaches to evolution and to scholastic philosophy. These topics are related. Can scholastic philosophy produce a theology of evolution? The answer is yes, especially when Peirce’s categories come into play. Peirce enlivens and revives scholastic concepts. The course begins with Speculations on Thomism and Evolution and Comments on Dennis Venema and Scot McKnight’s Book (2017) Adam and the Genome (which is to be read along with the comments). Then select four commentaries from this series or its complement, Peirce's Secondness and Aristotle's Hylomorphism, and read with the original articles.
Buttressing the Human Niche
The Human Niche stands on four foundational commentaries on recent books of human evolution. The works in this series examine other publications. Eventually, new literature will incorporate the hypothesis that humans adapted, and are still adapting, into the niche of triadic relations. New literature will also investigate the implications of the first singularity. These comments supplement the courses on the Human Niche and An Archaeology of the Fall. They complement the series, Reverberations of the Fall.
Reverberations of the Fall
The Fall of Adam and Eve is a fascinating topic. So is the hypothesis of the first singularity. ‘Our current Lebenswelt’ is not ‘the Lebenswelt that we evolved in’. Here, the reader will find comments and essays concerning the way both topics reverberate through time.
A Course on Implicit and Explicit Abstraction
This course opens the door to postmodern scholasticism. The Baroque scholastics (1580 to 1680AD) lived in Spain at the same time that Galileo, Descartes, and others founded the Age of Ideas. 300 years later, postmodern thought significantly overlaps with concerns of the Baroque scholastics. What is a mind-dependent being? What is abstraction? What is a sign? These are all covered in this course.
Peirce's Secondness and Aristotle's Hylomorphism
“Hyle” means “matter”. “Morphe” means “form”. According to Aristotle, matter and form are two real, yet contiguous, elements. C. S. Peirce defines the category of secondness as two contiguous real elements. The category of secondness is the realm of actuality. Actuality participates in the category-based nested form. This series builds on two primers. The first is A Primer on the Category-Based Nested Form. The second is A Primer on Sensible and Social Construction. A hypothesis unfolds. Aristotle’s hylomorphism and Peirce’s secondness cohere. The word, “substance”, may expand to include “the contiguity between two real elements”. In this definition, Peirce’s postmodernism and Aristotle’s premodernism begin to speak to one another. These commentaries are conversations. As for high-school and college education, the above primers, along with six commentaries, constitutes a short course. Read both the original and the commentary.
Empirio-schematics
In Philosophy of Nature (1935), Jacques Maritain wrestles with the modern sciences as opposed to natural philosophy. He considers the scholastic's concept of three degrees of abstraction: the physical, the typological and the extensive. Could these help in comprehending science? Or, is there a trick? Yes, the triadic structure of judgment, along with Maritain’s three degrees of visualization, show how modern science and scholasticism have something in common.
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Books

Comments on Jack Reynolds' Book (2018) "Phenomenology, Naturalism and Science"
Series: Phenomenology and the Positivist Intellect. Price: $2.10 USD. Words: 10,470. Language: English. Published: January 26, 2022. Categories: Nonfiction » Philosophy » Movements / Phenomenology, Nonfiction » Philosophy » Logic
In 2018, Prof. Jack Reynolds publishes a book with the subtitle: A Hybrid and Heretical Proposal. Can one conjoin naturalized phenomenology and weak methodological naturalism? Good question. Surprising answers. These comments use the category-based nested form and other relational models developed within the tradition of C.S. Peirce.
Comments on Richard Colledge’s Essay (2021) "Thomism and Contemporary Phenomenological Realism"
In 2021, Richard Colledge publishes an article in the American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly exploring the possibility of a renewed engagement. Can these two traditions profitably interact? Or does the interaction produce a revealing intellectual twist? These comments use the category-based nested form and other relational models developed within the tradition of C. S. Peirce.
Comments on Joseph Trabbic’s Essay (2021) "Jean-Luc Marion and ... First Philosophy"
In 2021, Joseph Trabbic publishes an inquiry in the American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly. He asks, "What is Jean-Luc Marion talking about?" The missing portion of the title is in French and translates as "The Phenomenology of the Gift". Or perhaps, "Givenness". These comments use the category-based nested form and other relational models developed within the tradition of C.S. Peirce.
A Reverie on Mark Spencer’s Essay (2021) "The Many Phenomenological Reductions"
In 2021, Mark Spencer publishes an essay in the American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly, concerning phenomenology and metaphysics. Do both engage modern science? Are reductions in phenomenology similar to anti-reductions in metaphysics? Should they speak to one another? These comments use the category-based nested form and other relational models developed within the tradition of C.S. Peirce.
Comments on Brian Kemple’s Essay (2020) "Signs and Reality"
In 2020, Brian Kemple publishes an article in Reality: A Journal for Philosophical Discourse. The point is simple. Triadic relations, such as signs, are things. They are real, even though they appear to be contingent upon um... things. Maybe the point is not so simple. These comments use the category-based nested form and other relational models developed within the tradition of C.S. Peirce.
Comments on Manvir Singh’s Essay (2021) "Magic, Explanations and Evil"
Series: Re-Articulations · Intimations of Political Philosophy. Price: $2.15 USD. Words: 6,420. Language: English. Published: June 15, 2021. Categories: Nonfiction » Social Science » Anthropology, Nonfiction » Science & Nature » Anthropology
In 2021, Manvir Singh publishes an article in Current Anthropology, proposing that cultural selection may account for the origins and design of witches and sorcerers. These comments examine his proposal using triadic structures in the tradition of Charles Peirce. Key features of Singh's explanation associate to two interscopes, the organization and the individual in community.
Comments on Chris Sinha’s Essay (2018) "Praxis, Symbol and Language"
Series: Buttressing the Human Niche. Price: $2.15 USD. Words: 5,330. Language: English. Published: April 24, 2021. Categories: Nonfiction » Social Science » Anthropology, Nonfiction » Science & Nature » Anthropology
In 2018, Chris Sinha adds to his continuing framework for appreciating the evolution of language. This article covers developmental, ecological and linguistic topics. These comments use the category-based nested form and other relational models developed within the tradition of C.S. Peirce. The evolution of talk is not the same as the evolution of language.
Comments on Gregory Sandstrom’s Book (2014) "Human Extension"
Series: Reverberations of the Fall · A Course on Implicit and Explicit Abstraction. Price: $2.14 USD. Words: 6,590. Language: English. Published: February 13, 2021. Categories: Nonfiction » Social Science » Sociology, Nonfiction » Psychology » General
In 2014, Gregory Sandstrom publishes a book arguing for human extension, as a discipline of inquiry. These comments use the category-based nested form as a way to depict human extension, as well as include human intension. Human extension and intension are alternatives to the modern disciplines of sociology and psychology. Sandstrom's innovation shows promise.
Comments on Gregory Sandstrom’s Essay (2013) "Peace for Evolution's Puzzle"
Series: Re-Articulations · A Course on Implicit and Explicit Abstraction. Price: $2.15 USD. Words: 5,290. Language: English. Published: January 16, 2021. Categories: Nonfiction » Social Science » Sociology, Nonfiction » Social Science » Anthropology
In 2013, Gregory Sandstrom publishes on the arrival of the doctrine of human extension. Evolutionary theory takes the inquirer only so far. The humanities and social sciences must extends fields such as cognitive and evolutionary psychology. These comments re-articulate Sandstrom's claims using the first singularity and relational models developed within the traditions of Peirce and Greimas.
Comments on Five Views in the Book (2020) "Original Sin and the Fall"
Series: Reverberations of the Fall · A Course on Evolution and Thomism. Price: $3.07 USD. Words: 11,190. Language: English. Published: December 26, 2020. Categories: Nonfiction » Social Science » Anthropology, Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Biblical Criticism & Interpretation / General
In 2020, J. B. Stump and Chad Meister edit a volume expressing five views of Original Sin and the Fall. The view include strict and moderate Reformed, Methodist, Russian Orthodox and Jesuit traditions. These comments use the hypothesis of the first singularity, the category-based nested form and other relational models developed within the tradition of C.S. Peirce.
Comments on Marc Champagne’s Lecture (2019) "Consciousness and the Philosophy of Signs"
Series: Re-Articulations. Price: $1.55 USD. Words: 4,230. Language: English. Published: December 26, 2020. Categories: Nonfiction » Philosophy » Movements / Phenomenology, Nonfiction » Philosophy » Metaphysics
In 2018, Marc Champagne publishes a book on consciousness and Peirce’s philosophy of signs. One year later, he presents a lecture to the Toronto Semiotic Circle. Cognitive psychology has limits. The discipline will never account for the feeling of consciousness. These comments examines this presentation, using category-based nested forms and the triadic structure of judgment.
Comments on Christopher Austin and Anna Marmodoro's Essay (2018) "Structural Powers"
Series: Peirce's Secondness and Aristotle's Hylomorphism. Price: $2.46 USD. Words: 7,800. Language: English. Published: December 21, 2020. Categories: Nonfiction » Philosophy » Metaphysics, Nonfiction » Science & Nature » Research & Methodology
Why do living creatures maintain their integrity over time? In 2018, Christopher J. Austin and Anna Marmodoro write a book chapter on this topic in Neo-Aristotelian Perspectives on Contemporary Science. These comments examine their argument using the category-based nested form, the Positivist's judgment and other relational models developed within the tradition of C.S. Peirce.
Comments on Janice Breidenbach’s Essay (2018) "Action, Agency, and Substance Causation"
Series: Peirce's Secondness and Aristotle's Hylomorphism · Empirio-schematics. Price: $1.55 USD. Words: 4,800. Language: English. Published: December 15, 2020. Categories: Nonfiction » Philosophy » Mind & Body, Nonfiction » Philosophy » Metaphysics
In 2018, Janice Breidenbach writes on the question of agent. What is an agent? How does naturalism apply? These comments use the category-based nested form and other relational models developed within the tradition of C. S. Peirce.
Comments on David Melvin’s Essay (2010) "Divine Mediation And The Rise Of Civilization"
Series: Reverberations of the Fall. Price: $1.55 USD. Words: 4,460. Language: English. Published: December 12, 2020. Categories: Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Christian Theology / Anthropology, Nonfiction » History » Civilization
David Melvin compares accounts for the rise of civilization from two bodies of literature, ancient Mesopotamian and Biblical. In one, gods transfer the arts of civilization to grateful humans. In the other, humans create civilization on their own. Here, Melvin's comparison is considered in light of the hypothesis of the first singularity.
Comments on Christopher Austin’s Essay (2018) "A Biologically Informed Hylomorphism"
Series: Peirce's Secondness and Aristotle's Hylomorphism. Price: $1.55 USD. Words: 3,730. Language: English. Published: December 7, 2020. Categories: Nonfiction » Philosophy » Logic, Nonfiction » Philosophy » Metaphysics
Does biology depend on hylomorphism? Very interesting question. In 2018, Christopher J. Austin publishes an book chapter in Neo-Aristotelian Perspectives on Contemporary Science. These comments examine Austin's argument using category-based nested form, the empirio-schematic and Positivist's judgments and other relational models developed within the tradition of C. S. Peirce.
Comments on Daniel Houck’s Book (2020) "Aquinas, Original Sin And The Challenge Of Evolution"
Series: Reverberations of the Fall · A Course on Evolution and Thomism · Peirce's Secondness and Aristotle's Hylomorphism. Price: $3.10 USD. Words: 16,160. Language: English. Published: December 5, 2020. Categories: Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Religion & Science, Nonfiction » Philosophy » Metaphysics
In 2020, Daniel W. Houck publishes a book, addressing the question, "How to adapt the views of original sin, by one of the most famous medieval theologians, to the modern era?" The hypothesis of the first singularity takes Houck's effort to another plane. There is a historic event that associates to the fairy tales of starting at Genesis 2.4.
Comments on Ahmed Badawi’s Essay (2018) "Conflicted Rules Theory"
Series: Intimations of Political Philosophy · Buttressing the Human Niche. Price: $2.15 USD. Words: 8,850. Language: English. Published: November 28, 2020. Categories: Nonfiction » Social Science » Sociology, Nonfiction » Social Science » Social psychology
In 2018, Dr. Ahmed Mousa Badawi publishes an essay in the Wadi Al-Nil Journal, concerning Sociological Theory. Rules among social circles, micro, meso, macro, as well as regal and global, conflict. These comments re-articulate this proposed model, using the category-based nested form and other relational models developed within the tradition of C.S. Peirce.
Comments on William Jaworski’s Essay (2018) "Psychology Without A Mental-Physical Dichotomy"
Series: Peirce's Secondness and Aristotle's Hylomorphism. Price: $2.00 USD. Words: 5,520. Language: English. Published: November 27, 2020. Categories: Nonfiction » Psychology » General, Nonfiction » Philosophy » Metaphysics
William Jaworski questions the plausibility of the mental-physical dichotomy, using a Neo-Aristotelian framework. These comments examine the argument using Peircean structures, such as the category-based nested form, the triadic structure of judgment and the dyad of secondness. Aristotle’s hylomorphism associates to Peirce’s category of secondness.
Comments on Mansoureh Tajik’s Articles (2020) "Understanding the Concepts of Imamat and Wilayat in Shi'a Islam"
Series: Intimations of Political Philosophy. Price: $2.00 USD. Words: 6,100. Language: English. Published: November 22, 2020. Categories: Nonfiction » Philosophy » Political, Nonfiction » Philosophy » Religious philosophy
In October 2020, Mansoureh Tajik publishes three essays on the Saker blog. They strive to explain key terms in Shi'a governance in Iran. More articles may follow. However, these three works yield a wealth of associations to category-based nested forms, leading to a comparison between two interscopes, one for the Iranian Republic and one for Big Government (il)Liberalism.
Comments on Massimo Leone’s Article (2019) "Semiotics of Religion: A Map"
Series: Re-Articulations · Empirio-schematics. Price: $2.20 USD. Words: 4,680. Language: English. Published: September 7, 2020. Categories: Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Psychology of Religion, Nonfiction » Science & Nature » Anthropology
In 2019, Massimo Leone, an academic at Shanghai University, China, and University of Turin, Italy, publishes an article in The American Journal of Semiotics, entitled “Semiotics of Religion: A Map”. These comments explore this text, using various relational models, including the empirio-schematic judgment and the category-based nested form.
Comments on James DeFrancisco’s Essay "Original Sin and Ancestral Sin"
Series: Reverberations of the Fall · A Course on Evolution and Thomism. Price: $2.43 USD. Words: 10,700. Language: English. Published: August 27, 2020. Categories: Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Christian Theology / Anthropology, Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Religion & Science
In 2020, I download an undated essay, probably published around 12 years ago. The author considers the question, “Who is Adam?”. The Western and Eastern Churches give different answers. Is one better than the other? Do they complement one another? These comments use the category-based nested form and other relational models developed within the tradition of C.S. Peirce.
Comments on Marie George’s Essay (2019) "Aquinas Teachings on Concepts and Words"
Series: Reverberations of the Fall · A Course on Evolution and Thomism. Price: $2.15 USD. Words: 7,030. Language: English. Published: August 22, 2020. Categories: Nonfiction » Philosophy » Metaphysics, Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Religion & Science
In 2020, Marie I. George publishes an article contra Nicanor Austriaco, O.P. The debate addresses the question, “Which comes first, abstraction or language?” These comments use the category-based nested form and other relational models developed within the tradition of C.S. Peirce.
Comments on Nicanor Austriaco’s Essay (2018) "Defending Adam After Darwin"
Series: Reverberations of the Fall · A Course on Evolution and Thomism. Price: $2.15 USD. Words: 5,610. Language: English. Published: August 15, 2020. Categories: Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Religion & Science, Nonfiction » Philosophy » Metaphysics
In 2018, Nicanor Austriaco, OP, publishes an argument in the American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly. A philosophical bias in biology rules out the realness of Adam. If that bias is overcome, then what might the realness of Adam look like? These comments use the category-based nested form and other relational models developed within the tradition of C.S. Peirce.
Comments on Daniel De Haan’s Essay (2018) "Hylomorphism and the New Mechanist Philosophy"
Series: Peirce's Secondness and Aristotle's Hylomorphism. Price: $2.15 USD. Words: 6,850. Language: English. Published: July 3, 2020. Categories: Nonfiction » Science & Nature » Philosophy of Science, Nonfiction » Philosophy » Metaphysics
In 2018, Daniel De Haan publishes an exploration concerning Arisotle’s hylomorphism and new philosophical approaches to Biology, Neuroscience, and Psychology. The tone is conciliatory. Perhaps, they can gain a mutual understanding. Yes, indeed. These comments rely on Peirce’s secondness and the triadic structure of judgment.
Comments on Marco Stango’s Essay (2017) "Understanding Hylomorphic Dualism"
Series: Peirce's Secondness and Aristotle's Hylomorphism. Price: $2.15 USD. Words: 3,300. Language: English. Published: June 8, 2020. Categories: Nonfiction » Philosophy » Metaphysics, Nonfiction » Philosophy » Logic
In 2017, philosopher Marco Stango claims that the standard interpretation of Aquinas’s philosophy of mind does not satisfy. Weak hylomorphic dualism is an inadequate model compared to strong hylomorphic dualism. In these comments, the category-based nested form is used to re-articulate this argument, yielding an alternate, complementary, model.
Comments on John Brungardt’s Post (2019) "Those Two Roads"
Thomistica is a website, sponsored by the Sacra Doctrina Project, containing substantial scholarly posts. In 2019, John G. Brungardt posts a proposal concerning difficulties arising from Aristotle’s definition of motion and how they may serve theology. My comments speculatively recast his argument using Peirce’s secondness and the category-based nested form.
Comments on Robert Koons’s Essay (2018) "Hylomorphic Escalation"
Series: Peirce's Secondness and Aristotle's Hylomorphism. Price: $1.75 USD. Words: 2,170. Language: English. Published: April 25, 2020. Categories: Nonfiction » Philosophy » Metaphysics, Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Religion & Science
Robert C. Koons proposes an Aristotelian interpretation of quantum physics and thermodynamics. Hylomorphism concerns matter and form. If matter is modeled by quantum physics, then how does matter compose a thermodynamic form, such as a bulk chemical? Is matter the part? Is form the whole? These comments examines Koons’s answers using the category-based nested form.
Comments on Christy Hemphill’s Essay (2019) "All in a Week’s Work"
Series: Buttressing the Human Niche · A Course on Evolution and Thomism. Price: $1.80 USD. Words: 3,050. Language: English. Published: April 4, 2020. Categories: Nonfiction » Psychology » Cognitive psychology, Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Religion & Science
Translator Christy Hemphill examines the Creation Story in Genesis, using metaphor theory. Image-based and conceptual metaphors open our eyes to figurative meaning and facilitate the construction of category-based nested forms. Metaphor theory allows artists to pass from literal to figurative meaning.
Comments on Robert Verrill’s Essay (2017) "Elementary Particles Are Not Substances"
Series: Peirce's Secondness and Aristotle's Hylomorphism. Price: $2.00 USD. Words: 5,380. Language: English. Published: February 27, 2020. Categories: Nonfiction » Science & Nature » Philosophy of Science, Nonfiction » Philosophy » Metaphysics
In 2017, Robert Verrill, OP, relying solely on the resources of the Thomist school, establishes the title’s claim. In the process, he raises a critical question. How does one decouple Aquinas’s philosophy from Aristotle’s physics? These comments use the category-based nested form, Maritain’s models of positivist thought, and other relational models developed within the tradition of C.S. Peirce.
Comments on John Barrett and Krystalli Damilati’s Essay (2004) "Some Light on the Early Origins of Them All"
Series: Buttressing the Human Niche · Empirio-schematics. Price: $2.25 USD. Words: 8,590. Language: English. Published: November 24, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Social Science » Archaeology, Nonfiction » Social Science » Anthropology
In 2004, John C. Barrett and Paul Halstead edit a retrospective on Colin Renfrew’s book, “The Emergence of Civilization” (1972). In this theory-based essay, Barrett and Damilati discuss trends in archaeology since that publication. These comments examine their discussion in light of Maritain’s model of positivist judgment and category-based models of adaptation.
Comments on Stella Souvatzi, Adnan Baysal and Emma Baysal’s Essay (2019) "Is there Pre-history"
Series: Buttressing the Human Niche. Price: $1.53 USD. Words: 4,360. Language: English. Published: November 17, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Social Science » Archaeology, Nonfiction » Social Science » Anthropology
Professors of Archaeology at Hellenic Open University, Greece, and at Trakya University, Turkey, write an introduction to their edited volume, “Time and History in Prehistory”. They ask, “Is there pre-history?” These comments celebrate this question and analyze the answer using the category-based nested form and the hypothesis of first singularity.
Comments on Fr. Thomas White’s Essay (2019) "Thomism for the New Evangelization"
Series: Considerations of Jacques Maritain, John Deely and Thomistic Approaches to the Questions of These Times. Price: $2.00 USD. Words: 5,900. Language: English. Published: November 9, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Religious philosophy, Nonfiction » Philosophy » Metaphysics
Why does Thomism matter? In 2019, Fr. Thomas Joseph White, O.P., offers his insights on the promise of Thomism for the new evangelization. His argument touches on six key points. These comments show how Peirce’s categories and semiotics bring these key points, as well as the promise of Thomism, forward, in novel ways. Welcome to the Age of Triadic Relations.
Comments on Donna West’s Essay (2019) "Thirdness along the Intuitional Path"
In 2019, Donna West publishes an inquiry in Studia Gilsoniana. The complete title is “Thirdness along the Intuitional Path: Reflections from Maritain and Peirce”. The essay addresses a key question: What are the pre-conditions for the emergence of event relations? These comments diagram features using the category-based nested form and the triadic structure of judgment.
Comments on Steve Fuller’s Essay (2017) "Brexit as the Unlikely Leading Edge of the Anti-Expert Revolution"
Series: Empirio-schematics. Price: $2.00 USD. Words: 5,270. Language: English. Published: October 17, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Social Science » Sociology, Nonfiction » Philosophy » Epistemology
In 2017, Professor Steve Fuller, applies his long-standing hypothesis of an ongoing anti-expert revolution to two political moments: Brexit and Intelligent Design. These comments model his argument using the positivist and empirio-schematic judgment along with a well-established semiotic tool, the Greimas square.
Comments on Michal Chaberek’s Essay (2019) "Classical Metaphysics and Theistic Evolution"
Series: A Course on Evolution and Thomism · Peirce's Secondness and Aristotle's Hylomorphism. Price: $2.00 USD. Words: 5,560. Language: English. Published: September 14, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Philosophy » Metaphysics, Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Religion & Science
In 2019, Michal Chaberek publishes an inquiry into the incompatibility between classical metaphysics and theistic evolution. Yes, the key word is “incompatible”. The question is “why?”. Is theistic evolution a fig leaf for atheistic materialism? If so, then the incompatibility needs to be nuanced. These comments show how Chaberek’s criticism opens the path to theistic entanglement.
Comments on Andrew Milner, JR Burgmann, Rjurik Davidson and Susan Cousin’s Essay (2015) "Ice, Fire and Flood: Science Fiction and the Anthropocene"
Series: Empirio-schematics. Price: $1.95 USD. Words: 5,720. Language: English. Published: August 3, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Social Science » Research, Nonfiction » Literary criticism » Semiotics & Theory
In 2015, Andrew Milner, JR Burgmann, Rjurik Davidson and Susan Cousins publish an essay in Thesis Eleven, a journal ranging from critical theory to historical sociology. The essay riffs off the term “sci-fi” with the neologism “cli-sci”. These comments rely on two triadic models developed in Comments on Jacques Maritain’s Book (1935) Natural Philosophy.
Comments on Kim Sterelny’s Essay (2011) "From Hominins to Humans"
Series: Buttressing the Human Niche. Price: $1.95 USD. Words: 4,130. Language: English. Published: August 3, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Science & Nature » Evolution, Nonfiction » Social Science » Archaeology
In 2011, Kim Sterelny publishes an article in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, addressing the question of how sapiens became behaviorally modern. These comments address this issue from the point of view of the human niche, using category-based nested forms.
Comments on Mariusz Tabaczek’s Essay (2019) "What do God and Creatures Really Do in an Evolutionary Change?"
Series: A Course on Evolution and Thomism · Peirce's Secondness and Aristotle's Hylomorphism. Price: $2.15 USD. Words: 5,800. Language: English. Published: July 27, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Religion & Science, Nonfiction » Philosophy » Metaphysics
In 2019, Mariusz Tabaczek, OP, publishes an essay in the American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly. The subtitle is “Divine Concurrence and Transformation from the Thomistic Perspective”. These comments use the category-based nested form and other relational models developed within the tradition of C.S. Peirce.
Comments on Matthew Minerd’s Essay (2019) "Thomism and the Formal Object of Logic"
In 2019, Matthew Minerd publishes a narrative in the American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly. The story concerns the historical development of the science of logic within the Thomist school. These comments use the category-based nested form and other relational models developed within the tradition of C.S. Peirce.
Comments on Tyler Paytas' Essay (2019) "Divine Hiddenness as Kantian Theodicy"
Series: Intimations of Political Philosophy. Price: $2.00 USD. Words: 2,770. Language: English. Published: March 3, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Christian Theology / Anthropology, Nonfiction » Philosophy » Good & evil
In 2019, Tyler Paytas, at Australian Catholic University, publishes an essay “Of Providence and Puppet Shows: Divine Hiddenness as Kantian Theodicy”. The argument knits two theological questions together. My comments examine this article using the triadic structure of judgment, the category based nested form and the interscope of the society tier.
Comments on Giovanni Maddalena's Essay (2017) "Jung and Peirce"
Series: Empirio-schematics. Price: $2.25 USD. Words: 3,190. Language: English. Published: March 3, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Philosophy » American philosophy, Nonfiction » Psychology » Psychotherapy / general
Giovanni Maddalena, author of A Philosophy of Gesture, publishes an article entitled Jung and Peirce: Towards a Psychosynthesis. These comments explore the argument using the category-based nested form, enriching our appreciation of the complementarity between Jung's and Peirce's traditions.
Comments on Joseph Carroll’s Chapter (2018) "Evolutionary Literary Theory"
Series: Re-Articulations. Price: $2.00 USD. Words: 3,670. Language: English. Published: March 3, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Literary criticism » Semiotics & Theory
In 2018, Joseph Carroll publishes a chapter in A Companion to Literary Theory. The title of the chapter is "Evolutionary Literary Theory". These comments offer a polemical response, while agreeing with Carroll's visionary intent. What is the adaptive function of literature? Look and see.
Comments on Jacques Lacan’s (1960) Discourse to Catholics
Series: Re-Articulations. Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 13,390. Language: English. Published: January 15, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Psychology » Psychotherapy / general, Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Christianity
This essay comments on two lectures given by Jacques Lacan to the Faculty of St. Louis University in Brussels, Belgium, and translated by Bruce Fink in 2013. My goal is to re-articulate Lacan’s argument in the specialized language of the category-based nested form.
Comments on Nicholas Berdyaev's Book (1939) Spirit and Reality
What is Spirit? What is Reality? Nicholas Berdyaev, a contemporary of Jacques Maritain, takes Positivist and empirio-schematic judgments in surprising directions. These comments rely on diagrams of these triadic structures developed in Comments on Jacques Maritain's Book (1935) Natural Philosophy.
Comments on Carlos Blanco-Perez's Essay (2018) "On the Principles of a Social Theory"
Series: A Course on Implicit and Explicit Abstraction · Empirio-schematics. Price: $2.15 USD. Words: 6,130. Language: English. Published: December 8, 2018. Categories: Nonfiction » Social Science » Anthropology, Nonfiction » Philosophy » Social
Carlos Blanco-Perez publishes an essay in the October 2018 issue of Cadmus. He identifies ten postulates essential for a viable social theory. Ironically, the word "essential" serves as a pivotal starting point for constructing a feedback loop that satisfies the 10 principles. The resulting model should prove useful for appreciating the nature of social theory.
Comments on Egil Asprem and Ann Taves’s Essay (2018) "Explanation and the Study of Religion"
Series: Empirio-schematics. Price: $2.00 USD. Words: 4,840. Language: English. Published: November 10, 2018. Categories: Nonfiction » Social Science » Anthropology, Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Religion & Science
In 2018, Egil Asprem, at Stockholm University and Ann Taves, at University of California at Santa Barbara, publish the essay “Explanation and the Study of Religion”. My comments examine this article using models developed in comments on Wayne Proudfoot’s book, Religious Experience, and Jacques Maritain’s book, Natural Philosophy.
Comments on David Reich's Book (2018) Who We Are and How We Got Here
Series: Buttressing the Human Niche. Price: $2.25 USD. Words: 6,030. Language: English. Published: October 27, 2018. Categories: Nonfiction » Science & Nature » Evolution, Nonfiction » Social Science » Anthropology
David Reich, Harvard geneticist, updates the vision of Luca Cavalli-Sforza, who first explored the idea that our genetics may provide insight into human evolution and prehistory. The techniques for DNA sequencing and mathematical modeling substantially improved over the past decades. These comments examine Reich's update through the lens of the hypotheses of the human niche and first singularity.
Comments on Boris Hennig's Essay (2008) "Substance, Reality and Distinctness"
Series: Peirce's Secondness and Aristotle's Hylomorphism. Price: $1.80 USD. Words: 4,910. Language: English. Published: September 2, 2018. Categories: Nonfiction » Philosophy » European philosophy, Nonfiction » Philosophy » Religious philosophy
Boris Hennig, at Humbolt University in Berlin, writes about Descartes' view of substance. Descartes emphasizes distinctness and realness. Descartes applies the concept to God. These comments follow Hennig's argument in order to show how Descartes alters the word-scape of medieval scholasticism and sets the stage for empirio-schematic judgment.
Comments on Miguel Espinoza's Essay (2012) "Physics and the Intelligibility of Nature"
Series: Peirce's Secondness and Aristotle's Hylomorphism. Price: $2.00 USD. Words: 3,750. Language: English. Published: August 12, 2018. Categories: Nonfiction » Science & Nature » Philosophy of Science, Nonfiction » Philosophy » Criticism
Miguel Espinoza, French philosopher, publishes his essay in Teorema (vol 31(1) pp 75-97), critiquing the arguments of Emile Meyerson (1854-1933), a contemporary of neo-Thomist Jacques Maritain. My comments re-articulate this article using models of empirio-schematic and Positivist judgment.
Comments on Jeremy Cohen's Essay (1980) "Original Sin as The Evil Inclination"
Series: Reverberations of the Fall. Price: $2.00 USD. Words: 4,520. Language: English. Published: August 11, 2018. Categories: Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Christian Theology / Apologetics, Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Judaism / Theology
Jeremy Cohen, writing at Cornell University, publishes his essay in the Harvard Theological Review (vol 73(3/4) pp 495-520). He raises three concentric questions, leading to a comparison of Christian doctrine of original sin and the Jewish concept of the evil inclination. My comments examine this article using the category-based nested form and the first singularity.
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