Re Marzullo

Biography

"Writing is like breathing. If I don't do it, I don't feel so good."

This quote really sums up my love of reading, writing, and words in general. My whole life I've just felt better when I'm creating something. After trying painting, pottery, and a very short stint in a home ec class (I sewed a shirt that even my dog wouldn't wear), I've realized that writing is the type of creating I'm best at.

Since I'm a middle school English teacher by day, I have worked morning (early) noon (lunch hours) and night (under the covers) to finish my first YA novel SPED which I am super excited to share with my students and the world.

In addition to writing, I also have a passionate love of football (Geaux Saints and Sic Em Dawgs), potato chips and peanut butter (not together #gross), and my amazing family.

Where to find Re Marzullo online


Where to buy in print


Books

SPED2
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 62,060. Language: English. Published: March 14, 2014. Categories: Fiction » Children’s books » Social Issues / Adolescence, Fiction » Children’s books » Social Issues / Adolescence
For months eighth grader Jack Parker has been trying to get out of his small group special ed classes and into regular ones, so why is he so freaked out when it finally happens? A close-up and comical look at middle school life, SPED2 continues Jack’s story as he discovers girls, dodges bullies, and takes a long (hard) look at himself.
SPED
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 45,570. Language: English. Published: May 25, 2013. Categories: Fiction » Young adult or teen » Humor
What's so "special" about Special Education? SPED lets you find out. Fast paced and funny, SPED tells the story of Jack Parker and the classmates in his small group SPED class. After two quiet years at Hickory Hills Middle School, Jack now must handle bullies at school and challenges at home as he learns that growing up means taking chances - not only for himself but for those he cares about.

Re Marzullo’s tag cloud

bullying    crushes    friendship    humor    middle school    parents    peer pressure