R.W. Peake

Biography

I am a 54 year old retired Infantry Marine, born and raised in Texas and currently living on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington state. I have been writing since my first novel, written at the age of 10, when my friends and yours truly fought off the Soviet hordes, who just happened to pick my block to launch their invasion. That was their big mistake.

But like a lot of dreams, it got sidetracked until recently, when I decided to focus my passion on an era and subject that interested me a great deal. Like my characters in Ancient Rome, I have served as the pointy tip of the spear of our nation's policy, and it is with this perspective that I tell the story of Titus Pullus and his friends.

Marching With Caesar-Conquest of Gaul is my first published novel, and is the first in a completed series that covers the career of Titus Pullus, the most recent being Marching With Caesar-Rise of Augustus.

Where to find R.W. Peake online


Books

Marching With Caesar-Rebellion
By
Price: $5.99 USD. Words: 203,310. Language: English. Published: March 10, 2014. Category: Fiction » Historical » Classical Greece & Rome
The next installment of Marching With Caesar® saga tells the story after the death of Titus Pullus, with his nephew and heir Gaius Porcinus. Through a combination of circumstances, Porcinus is not allowed to become equestrian and continues serving in the Legions. He participates in a campaign led by Tiberius Claudius Nero, suppressing rebellions that launched the career of the next Emperor of Rome
Marching With Caesar-Birth of the 10th Legion
By
Price: $4.99 USD. Words: 155,040. Language: English. Published: January 19, 2014. Category: Fiction » Historical » Classical Greece & Rome
Titus Pullus, the hero of the 10th Legion and the bestselling Marching With Caesar® series, tells his story from the very beginning of his life through his enlistment in the 10th Legion under Julius Caesar. Contains material previously released in Marching With Caesar-Conquest of Gaul.
Marching With Caesar-Final Campaign
By
Price: $5.99 USD. Words: 246,540. Language: English. Published: November 24, 2013. Category: Fiction » Historical » Classical Greece & Rome
The final installment of the Marching With Caesar series, featuring Titus Pullus, Legionary of Rome. Titus faces the biggest challenge of his career following the invasion of Thrace by Marcus Primus, who is brought to trial for his illegal actions. Titus finds himself embroiled in political intrigue and a trial, orchestrated by the leading men of Rome. But is Augustus himself involved?
Marching With Caesar-Rise of Augustus
By
Price: $5.99 USD. Words: 155,120. Language: English. Published: August 3, 2013. Category: Fiction » Historical » Classical Greece & Rome
In the penultimate chapter of the saga of Titus Pullus, Legionary of Rome, Titus has been promoted to the newly formalized post of Camp Prefect. Meanwhile in Rome, Augustus is consolidating his power. Will he do so at the expense of men like Titus Pullus, who are pawns in a far greater game, control of Rome?
Caesar Triumphant
By
Price: $6.99 USD. Words: 255,120. Language: English. Published: July 31, 2013. Category: Fiction » Historical » Classical Greece & Rome
What if Julius Caesar survived the Ides of March and went on to lead his army across Asia, to invade...Japan? Caesar Triumphant is a novel of a Caesar and the Legions of Rome pitted against what might be the only military force capable of defeating the greatest army of the ancient world, the samurai of Japan.
Marching With Caesar-Antony and Cleopatra: Part II-Cleopatra
By
Price: $5.99 USD. Words: 187,690. Language: English. Published: March 29, 2013. Category: Fiction » Historical » Ancient
In the fourth book of the Marching With Caesar series, Titus Pullus and his 10th Legion are still in the thick of the maelstrom after the assassination of Gaius Julius Caesar. With the disastrous campaign in Parthia behind them, Mark Antony continues his struggle with Octavian, both men vying for ultimate control of Rome.
Marching With Caesar-Antony and Cleopatra: Part I-Antony
By
Price: $5.99 USD. Words: 194,270. Language: English. Published: March 1, 2013. Category: Fiction » Historical » Ancient
In the third book of the critically acclaimed Marching With Caesar series, Titus Pullus and his 10th Legion serve under the command of the older Triumvir, Marcus Antonius, who leads them on a campaign into the wilds of Parthia. Throughout all of the trials and amid the danger,Titus must also lead the men of the 10th Legion through the political turmoil between Antony and Octavian.
Marching With Caesar-Civil War
By
Price: $5.99 USD. Words: 271,610. Language: English. Published: November 24, 2012. Category: Fiction » Historical » Classical Greece & Rome
In the second book of the critically acclaimed Marching With Caesar series, Titus Pullus and his friends in the 10th Legion are called on to serve as the agents of change as their general, Gaius Julius Caesar singlehandedly changes the Roman Republic to Empire. Titus must not only survive the battlefield but navigate the treacherous world of Roman politics.
Marching With Caesar-Conquest of Gaul
By
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 185,050. Language: English. Published: March 28, 2012. Category: Fiction » Historical » Classical Greece & Rome
(5.00 from 4 reviews)
Titus Pullus joined the 10th Legion in 61 BC as a young boy looking for adventure with his childhood friend. Forty-two years later, Titus looks back on the early part of his career when he was a Legionary, Marching With Caesar, as the greatest Roman of all conducted one of the most notable military campaigns of all time, the Conquest of Gaul.

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Smashwords book reviews by R.W. Peake

  • The Day Gaul Died on Dec. 18, 2012

    A great story told from a different viewpoint I must admit that, as the author of Marching With Caesar-Conquest of Gaul, which tells essentially the same story as Mr. Mizell's but from the more common viewpoint of the Roman side, I wasn't sure what to expect when I picked this up. But I decided to give it a go since I am, before anything else, a huge fan of this genre. I'm glad I did, and being completely honest, I wish Mr. Mizell had written his work before mine. Although I'm more a "grunt's-eye view" storyteller myself, what Mr. Mizell offers is a fresh and unique perspective of a story that has been told many, many times, but always from the perspective of the winner. Most importantly, I got a sense of what it might have FELT like to be on the other side, watching the relentless, remorseless machines that were the Legions of Rome, grinding and crushing everything and everyone in their path. By focusing his story on Vercassivellaunos, Mr. Mizell puts us close enough to the inner workings and mindset of Vercingetorix, but allows for a more detached viewpoint as the Arverni leader comes perilously close to accomplishing what no other Gallic tribe had been able to do in the previous five years, defeat Caesar and his Legions. No one else was able to unite as many of the tribes, and he was the only one who correctly determined that a war of attrition and a strategic attack of the food supplying the men in Caesar's army was the only way to achieve victory. What Mr. Mizell does is give us a glimpse into how Vercingetorix might have actually accomplished this, through threats, blackmail, flattery and bribery. As I said, while I personally like a bit more "blood and guts", Mr. Mizell is able to focus on the human aspect of what was a titanic struggle and make it so interesting, and so real that I didn't miss it. All in all, I think this is a great work, especially for his first book, and I think that anyone who is a true student of Caesar, the Legions, or this time period in Roman history should make this required reading to get a glimpse into the other side of war, and the story of The Day Gaul Died.
  • The Day Gaul Died on Dec. 18, 2012

    A great story told from a different viewpoint I must admit that, as the author of Marching With Caesar-Conquest of Gaul, which tells essentially the same story as Mr. Mizell's but from the more common viewpoint of the Roman side, I wasn't sure what to expect when I picked this up. But I decided to give it a go since I am, before anything else, a huge fan of this genre. I'm glad I did, and being completely honest, I wish Mr. Mizell had written his work before mine. Although I'm more a "grunt's-eye view" storyteller myself, what Mr. Mizell offers is a fresh and unique perspective of a story that has been told many, many times, but always from the perspective of the winner. Most importantly, I got a sense of what it might have FELT like to be on the other side, watching the relentless, remorseless machines that were the Legions of Rome, grinding and crushing everything and everyone in their path. By focusing his story on Vercassivellaunos, Mr. Mizell puts us close enough to the inner workings and mindset of Vercingetorix, but allows for a more detached viewpoint as the Arverni leader comes perilously close to accomplishing what no other Gallic tribe had been able to do in the previous five years, defeat Caesar and his Legions. No one else was able to unite as many of the tribes, and he was the only one who correctly determined that a war of attrition and a strategic attack of the food supplying the men in Caesar's army was the only way to achieve victory. What Mr. Mizell does is give us a glimpse into how Vercingetorix might have actually accomplished this, through threats, blackmail, flattery and bribery. As I said, while I personally like a bit more "blood and guts", Mr. Mizell is able to focus on the human aspect of what was a titanic struggle and make it so interesting, and so real that I didn't miss it. All in all, I think this is a great work, especially for his first book, and I think that anyone who is a true student of Caesar, the Legions, or this time period in Roman history should make this required reading to get a glimpse into the other side of war, and the story of The Day Gaul Died.
  • The Day Gaul Died on Dec. 18, 2012

    A great story told from a different viewpoint I must admit that, as the author of Marching With Caesar-Conquest of Gaul, which tells essentially the same story as Mr. Mizell's but from the more common viewpoint of the Roman side, I wasn't sure what to expect when I picked this up. But I decided to give it a go since I am, before anything else, a huge fan of this genre. I'm glad I did, and being completely honest, I wish Mr. Mizell had written his work before mine. Although I'm more a "grunt's-eye view" storyteller myself, what Mr. Mizell offers is a fresh and unique perspective of a story that has been told many, many times, but always from the perspective of the winner. Most importantly, I got a sense of what it might have FELT like to be on the other side, watching the relentless, remorseless machines that were the Legions of Rome, grinding and crushing everything and everyone in their path. By focusing his story on Vercassivellaunos, Mr. Mizell puts us close enough to the inner workings and mindset of Vercingetorix, but allows for a more detached viewpoint as the Arverni leader comes perilously close to accomplishing what no other Gallic tribe had been able to do in the previous five years, defeat Caesar and his Legions. No one else was able to unite as many of the tribes, and he was the only one who correctly determined that a war of attrition and a strategic attack of the food supplying the men in Caesar's army was the only way to achieve victory. What Mr. Mizell does is give us a glimpse into how Vercingetorix might have actually accomplished this, through threats, blackmail, flattery and bribery. As I said, while I personally like a bit more "blood and guts", Mr. Mizell is able to focus on the human aspect of what was a titanic struggle and make it so interesting, and so real that I didn't miss it. All in all, I think this is a great work, especially for his first book, and I think that anyone who is a true student of Caesar, the Legions, or this time period in Roman history should make this required reading to get a glimpse into the other side of war, and the story of The Day Gaul Died.