End of Innocence (Fargoer Short Stories, #1)

1 star1 star1 star0.75 star
Somewhere far in the north, in the middle of a dense forest, two girls have embarked on a sacred journey: a journey that is to end their carefree days among the children of their tribe. Grim as their world is, the destiny that is set upon them seems even darker, but such is often the way for the people of this land.

First chapter of Fargoer, a novel set in the mythic far north. More
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Published: July 12, 2012
Words: 5,320
Language: English
ISBN: 9789526645018
About Petteri Hannila

I'm a writer from Central Finland, a software designer by day and a dad/husband/dreamer/martial artist by night.

It all began when I was eight years old. I found out that there were books of Tarzan, my childhood hero. My mother started to read them to me, but censored them - all of you who have read them know why. Annoyed by this, I started to read them on my own. Dreams and legends have followed me from those days, as companions on my voyage through life.

Only few years after that I thought about writing for the first time, but for a long time I pushed it away from my mind for supposedly more important things. Finally I understood that none of my stories would ever see the daylight until I got started, and I did.

From the days of Tarzan, exciting adventures and fantasy stories set in the past and the future have been my interest. Thus, the natural choice for me was to start writing science fiction and fantasy. Some years ago the idea of Fargoer made its way into my consciousness, and it hasn't loosened its grip of me since.

New Fargoer stories and paths of Vierra's future circle in my thoughts until I write them out. There are so many stories to tell until the end, and that end is painted clearly on my mind.

Also by This Author

Reviews

Review by: sarah uk on Nov. 02, 2012 : star star star
(Source: I received a digital copy of this book for free on a read-to-review basis. Thanks to author Petteri Hannila.)
Vierra and Aure have both turned 13, and have both started menstruating. Now they go on a journey in the hottest part of the summer to give offerings to a figure known as ‘the mother’ and to return to their village as adults.

This was a good and intriguing short story, with just enough back story to set the scene, and a glimpse at who Vierra and Aura really are, and who they will become in the future.
Overall; A great start to this fantasy series.
6 out of 10.
(review of free book)

Review by: sarah uk on Nov. 02, 2012 : star star star
(Source: I received a digital copy of this book for free on a read-to-review basis. Thanks to author Petteri Hannila.)
Vierra and Aure have both turned 13, and have both started menstruating. Now they go on a journey in the hottest part of the summer to give offerings to a figure known as ‘the mother’ and to return to their village as adults.

This was a good and intriguing short story, with just enough back story to set the scene, and a glimpse at who Vierra and Aura really are, and who they will become in the future.
Overall; A great start to this fantasy series.
7 out of 10.
(review of free book)

Review by: J A-M on Sep. 10, 2012 : star star star star
Very good historical fantasy with approachable characters.

In my opinion, writing a historical fiction mixed with fantasy elements is one of the most challenging things you can do in fantasy genre. However, the writer of Fargoer stories succeeds to deliver interesting and historically acceptable fiction with just enough mystique so you can call Fargoer stories fantasy.

I've read Fargoer stories both in original Finnish format and in English. In my opinion, versions in Finnish serve the stories' setting better, but English versions are enjoyable too. Writer's style reminds me a bit of Robert E. Howards pulp adventures. However, style in Fargoer stories isn't as verbose and flamboyant as Howard's, and Fargoer is a bit less "pulpy", if that's even a word.

Here and there the pace of stories is a bit fast, and I could see these stretched out as longer stories. There are places where, the story goes forward a bit too fast and the opportunity to flesh out the scenes is a bit wasted. However, the Fargoer stories are enjoyable enough in short story format.

In my opinion, the strongest point of Fargoer is, that even if these are pulp stories, the writer manages to write believable fiction with approachable characters. These kind of stories in short story format don't have a lot of opportunities to flesh the characters out, but the writer manages to slip enough backstory to the characters to make them interesting. The characters aren't Conans or other mighty pulp heroes, but flawed and common people in brutal and dangerous times.
(review of free book)

Review by: nimetu on July 26, 2012 : star star star star star
I have read all three parts that have been published so far and was very pleased to find there that much of historical and even mythological reference ranging to Proto-Uralic cosmogonic myths. It’s obviously not easy to seamlessly combine historical references and a fantasy narrative, but the author managed the task. The story was also very plausible in terms of psychology and logic of action:
- psychology/inner story logic itself are as they should be: the actions are motivated and understandable;
- historical psychology is great. It’s obvious that characters in fantasy worlds, which are somewhat ancient/medieval, cannot act following the logic that we people of the industrial age follow. But nevertheless many authors let their characters act like modern human beings which are just set in a historical scenery. This makes stories always implausible, even fantasy ones. Here, this was not the case except of a few minor slips.
- every character has his own temper and behavior. I would say, the protagonists’ tempers even develop as story goes on, which is a characteristic of good fiction literature.
I personally liked most the scene where Aure and Vierra are fighting with Vierra saving her cousin sister in the end. I dare say that from this scene it could be seen that they two are on different stages of psychological development, with Aure being more primitive and Vierra more advanced. This scene makes the story even more plausible by giving it even more depth. Nobody knows for sure, but I truly believe that archaic societies developed not only slowly and evolutionally, but also by sudden breakthroughs which were possible when people were born who were psychologically and intellectually way ahead of their tribe. Further parts of the story are not published yet so I don’t know how it will go further, and maybe the author didn’t ever meant all the things that I see there. Then it’s cool anyway because it’s always cool when characters start living their own life besides the author’s will.
And, last but not least: great cover artwork.
(review of free book)

Review by: Tony Farnden on July 19, 2012 : star star star star
Fargoer - End of Innocence is a great short story for anyone who likes excitement, mysticism and adventure. It is a great introduction to the series. The characters are very real and have difficult decisions to make.

There is real poetry to be found here.
(review of free book)

Review by: Juha Salmi on July 17, 2012 : star star star star
Fargoer is an exciting short-story series from a novice writer Petteri Hannila. The driving force behind the stories is Finnish nature and its mysticism, which gives unique environment for fantasy stories. Stories are set in Iron Age, when in Finland hunters and gatherers give way for people who get food from agriculture. Fargoer combines fantasy with real issues successfully, creating a unique atmosphere.

Stories bring mind the Polish author Andrzej Sapkowski and his The Witcher series which draws from its strength eastern European cultural heritage. While Witcher draws much from dialogue between differed kinds of persons, Fargoer draws from action.
(review of free book)

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