Promised Valley Rebellion

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Prehistoric farmers inhabit a fertile river valley they believe their gods promised them. Their enemies, hunters roaming the hills beyond the valley, believe their gods gave it to them. When the farmers’ king refuses to allow the prince to marry the daughter of the farmer who saved the king's life in the last war with the hunters, her brother leads a rebellion to correct the flagrant injustice. More

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About Ron Fritsch

I grew up in rural northern Illinois. My father and mother were hard-working tenant farmers who loved to read. So did my siblings (one older sister, one older brother, one younger sister) and I.

I obtained a bachelor’s degree with honors from the University of Illinois (major: history; minor: English literature) and a law degree cum laude from Harvard Law School.

I became a public-service attorney representing indigent and disabled adults and abused and neglected children. All during my life as a lawyer, I spent most of my time writing arguments on behalf of my clients, in the trial courts as well as the higher appeals courts.

I live in the Andersonville neighborhood in Chicago with my partner of many years, David Darling.

I’m a member and director of the Association of Independent Authors.

This is an interview I did with Feathered Quill Book Reviews following its highly favorable review of Promised Valley Peace, the fourth and last novel in my Promised Valley series:

Today we’re talking with Ron Fritsch, author of Promised Valley Peace.

FQ: It is clear to me that you devoted much heart and soul toward character development and depth. How difficult will it be to turn out the light and close the door on Promised Valley and begin a new project?

FRITSCH: Your assumption about devoting “much heart and soul” in writing the four Promised Valley novels is absolutely correct. I published them in successive autumns from 2010 to 2013 (Promised Valley Rebellion in 2010, Promised Valley War in 2011, Promised Valley Conspiracy in 2012, and Promised Valley Peace in 2013). But even before I published Rebellion, I’d spent several years living with my characters night and day. I already miss them greatly. It’s as if a large group of friends—the “bad” guys as well as the “good” ones—suddenly went missing from my life. But it hasn’t been difficult to begin working on a new project. I’m apparently addicted to having characters in my mind and writing their stories. My new “friends” are getting as sassy and bold with me as Blue Sky, Rose Leaf, Wandering Star, and all the others in Promised Valley did.

FQ: In our previous interview of Promised Valley Conspiracy, I asked if you had plans to develop Promised Valley for the ‘big screen’ to which you said you would. How are your plans coming along?

FRITSCH: At the time of our previous interview I thought I might finish the four novels and immediately start writing screenplays for them, one film for each novel. After my partner and I, enticed by the first three seasons of the BBC’s Downton Abbey, viewed the entire Rome series on DVD, we began to wonder if one-season-per-novel television screenplays might better serve the complexity and many characters of the Promised Valley tale. Because we haven’t answered that question yet, I’ve started writing a stand-alone novel (more about that later).

FQ: I cannot help but think you must have experienced many moments throughout writing the series where you dreamed about your characters. Which character resonated most with you in Promised Valley Peace and what actor (or actress) would you envision playing the role (and why)?

FRITSCH: You’re so right again. My Promised Valley characters showed up in my dreams almost every night. And they still do. Every time I view a film or television drama that draws me in, I imagine the actors playing roles in Promised Valley. Wouldn’t she (Reese Witherspoon, say) be wonderful, I ask my partner, as Rose Leaf? My protagonist/main character is clearly Blue Sky, but playing him will be as difficult as acting gets. Severely suffering from what we’d call PTSD, he goes into a strange trance and fights on, killing whoever needs to die next. Can I suggest three related characters and the people who should play them? The Jake Gyllenhaal of Brokeback Mountain as Wandering Star. He shamelessly manipulates Blue Sky and admits he needs him in the same breath. Susan Sarandon as his mother, Dancing Song. Despite having seen it all, she’s still in love with life, letting “joy itself,” as she says when another character suddenly dies, “guide her feet in dance and her voice in song.” Tom Cruise as his father, Lightning Spear. Maimed and vindictive at the pinnacle of his youth, he’s now as cracked as his kingdom.

FQ: Horses play a more prominent and significant role in Promised Valley Peace. Why wait until the final novel to portray this premise?

FRITSCH: I wanted to show how the Promised Valley people gradually learned to use horses. Blue Sky’s grandparents acquired the first of them from the river people, as stronger but more wilful substitutes for oxen. Blue Sky, Rose Leaf, and Morning Sun secretly defy their parents and ride them. When the valley people face extinction, they use them for the heavy hauling they need to defend themselves in their upper valley. After two hill-boy refugees devise a way to ride horses in their hunts, riding them in battle becomes the obvious next step. Horses are to the Promised Valley people what nuclear weapons, guided missiles, and drone aircraft are to us. They’ll win you every battle you fight—but only as long as your enemy doesn’t have them.

FQ: You pose an interesting concept to the reader in your analogies of how the people are guided by the “gods.” What is your philosophy toward the “gods” guiding humans and your take on the notion of: “there are no coincidences in life”?

FRITSCH: In this telling of the Job story, the supernatural deity or deities who supposedly rule the universe lose out to human reason. As Blue Sky insists, his grandparents didn’t exchange most of what little they possessed for a river trader’s unwanted animals, i.e. horses, because some gods in a faraway, unseen heaven had asked them to. They did it because they were the desperate victims of a foolish king.

FQ: There are many complexities to the story as well as an abundance of key characters. How did you keep track of who was doing what during the writing process?

FRITSCH: I lived with these characters and their stories night and day for years. I came to know them—and I continue to know them—as well as any actual humans I’ve ever met. I dutifully maintained lists of characters and scenes throughout the writing of all four novels, but I rarely had to consult them to answer who did or said what at some earlier point in the story. I almost always knew. The lists were useful to assure me I had everything right.

FQ: You’re quite descriptive toward the Promised Valley landscape and the diversities between the hills and valleys. Is there any particular real place you spent time to develop the lay of the land in your fictitious Promised Valley?

FRITSCH: Even as a child, I knew I wanted to write a story about people peacefully occupying an exceptionally fertile river valley surrounded by mountains keeping out their enemies. Whenever I took auto trips with my family and friends through mountains and saw such a valley—always within the United States—I’d think it was the valley in my story. As I describe it in the Promised Valley series, though, it would have to be located in a temperate area in Eurasia or northern Africa.

FQ: I want to thank you for the pleasure of reading Promised Valley Peace. I’m looking forward to your next adventure. Would you care to share what that may be?

FRITSCH: And I thank you for the pleasure of reading your reviews of Promised Valley Conspiracy and Promised Valley Peace. I like to think of the novel I’m presently writing as fitting within a “Midwestern Gothic” genre, if there is such a thing. It’s set in a mostly German-American farming community in northern Illinois in the middle of the Twentieth Century—the Forties, Fifties, and Sixties. After the Second World War a young boy’s mother runs off with the lover she openly consorted with while the boy’s teenage father was fighting and drinking his way across northern Africa and western Europe. The boy’s father kills himself, leaving the boy in the care of his grandfather. The community suspects that man, however, of committing fraud and even murder on his way to ownership of the largest farm in the county. I best not say more!

To learn more about Promised Valley Peace, please read the review at: Feathered Quill Book Reviews.

Also in Promised Valley

Also by This Author

Reviews

Review by: Leigh K Cunningham on June 16, 2012 : star star star star star
There's so much to enjoy and love about Promised Valley Rebellion. First, it is chock full of well-developed, unique characters, and in case you get lost with the number of players in this suspense-filled historical piece, the author has kindly included a Character List, which I read after I had finished the novel as a way to re-cap the story.

I also really enjoyed the way Fritsch incorporated gay issues into prehistoric times - this has to be a first I'm sure, and created a fascinating juxtaposition as we tend to have a preconceived notion of prehistoric man. I'm interested to see what other current issues Fritsch might incorporate in the series.

In summary, Fritsch has managed to merge historical fiction, suspense and gay issues in a character-filled novel set in prehistoric times. It's no wonder Promised Valley Rebellion has gold medals to show for his efforts.

Do yourself a favor and read it for yourself.
(reviewed the day of purchase)

Review by: Bryn Hammond on Jan. 21, 2012 : star star star star star
I'm fascinated by prehistoric fiction, but haven't found much I'm happy with... so glad to come across this set of novels. What I liked: the characters are fully human, intelligent, with attitudes we recognise, either to go along with or argue with. Stories set in the distant past can assume people were dumber than us, which is unscientific I believe. The characters are engaging, I like and admire our young hero, who's a bit of a fighter for free speech and rights; and the crisis situation turns out to be a sort of conflict of nobility on both sides. I hope that isn't a spoiler. The end is heart-warming. I like the portrait of war, people's attitudes to war (again, we can assume people of the distant past were savage bloodthirsty idiots). I like the shamans - they're called tellers here - and their way of life, distinct from the community. And I like the pitting of hunter-gatherers against early farmers: the issues, the prejudices each has against the other. There are questions also of kingship and what tyranny is and isn't; and questions on religion and the gods. It's an examination of these matters, through a story that's strong and easy to get involved in. Best, we don't have to leave the world: there's a sequel and more to come.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

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