Clap!

Straight with no chaser perspective on successfully building a long-term relationship. If you seriously want one,this is how to do it. More

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About E. Joyce Moore

E. Joyce Moore, writer of articles, essays including The Reality of Our Mentality, screenplays, contributor to Chicken Soup for the African American Soul, and What is the Purpose of a Banana?, poet, author of Ramblings Through the Attic of Thought and 'SHIPS (non-fiction), published by ATTMP and available on Amazon in both paperback and Kindle formats

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Trailer for Clap!

Reviews

Review by: Timothy Stelly, Sr on Jan. 28, 2013 : (no rating)
Author E, Joyce Moore’s Clap is a relationship primer that falls into the category of “essential read” for both males and females. It is not only a walk through the labyrinthine nuances of burgeoning romance, but a safety primer—physical and psychologically, an emotional life preserver. It’s a most-useful read for young women who too often ignore or fail to recognize the warning signs of a dangerous dilemma. Like a person in a crowded nightclub who smells smoke, too many of the eager for love will try and squeeze in one last dance rather than heed the warning and head for the exit. The end result if one does make it out, its only after being trampled.

Moore covers a variety of topics including online dating, first dates and dealing with a loved ones family members. Not a wasted word and even if you’ve heard some of it before, its doubtful it was as concise and eloquently worded as this.

This is not a one-sided piece aimed at “females only.” Moore uses frank language applicable to men and women and bashes no one. The author notes the necessity of men also keeping their eyes and options open and presents an opportunity for self-analysis and growth rather than a balls-shrinking look in the mirror.

Let’s be blunt: this piece has the potential to save lives by pointing out the pitfalls of pursuit. It is a b.s.-detector that provides a warning against pretty boys with ugly habits and women “too good to be true” and aren’t. Here is clear-cut language detailing the warning signs of abusive people, sans the clinical and clichéd analysis. Seldom have I used the expression “keeping it real” in a more applicable context.

This ain’t fairy tale, folks. Reality bites with the power of a pit bull. We’ve all seen people who’ve become conveniently color-blind and ignored the red flags: He/She has issues, but they’re so fine/rich or whatnot. Moore points out the danger of “but…” using seasoned reasoning and shows why this attitude is the emotional equivalent of hang-gliding near power lines while drunk and blindfolded.

Kudos to an author unafraid to wear her heart and her brain on her sleeve.
(reviewed the day of purchase)

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