The Fragile Bridge: Conflict Management in Chinese Business

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Negotiating successfully in China means handling conflict across cultural divides. Avoid conflict when you can, mitigate conflict when you can't, and manage conflict when you must. More

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About Andrew Hupert

Andrew Hupert is founder and CEO of Best Practices China Ltd., based in Hong Kong. Since 2003 he has been advising training, and coaching executives and managers in multinationals to improve their deal-making and negotiating skills with Chinese counterparties. He is a sought after speaker at corporate events and EMBA tours. During his time in Shanghai he served as an adjunct professor at New York University (Shanghai campus) and lectured at Strathclyde University’s EMBA program.
Andrew first came to Asia in 1990 after receiving his MBA in Finance from New York University Stern School of Management. He gained extensive senior sales and management experience in Taipei, Hong Kong, Kyoto and New York before settling in Shanghai as a consultant and lecturer. He has published articles in business journals such as, Business Forum China, Shanghai Business Review and the China Economic Review.
Companies around the world follow his discussions about negotiation tactics in China on ChineseNegotiation.com. He can be reached via email at andrew.hupert@gmail.com or online at www.AndrewHupert.com

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Reviews

Review by: G. E. Anderson on Sep. 06, 2012 :
Andrew Hupert provides the reader not just with practical advice on structuring agreements and contracts, but more importantly, he spells out the warning signs of future conflict. Many behaviors that come natural to the Western business person appear as red flags to their Chinese counterparts, and avoidance of these behaviors are a real key to setting up a partnership for success.

Even the word “conflict” in the title of this book should be an indicator of just how differently the Chinese and Western sides of a partnership approach business. Much of what counts for “conflict” in this book is indeed “conflict” from a Western perspective, but from the Chinese perspective, it is simply part of doing business. While Westerners are accustomed to a fair amount of conflict leading up to the signing of a contract, the general expectation is that this is the point at which conflict ends, and both parties do their best to adhere to the terms of the contract.

While it has now become practically cliché to say that Chinese and Westerners view contracts differently, Hupert opens a door on what the Chinese side is thinking both before and after contract signing, how they constantly assess the performance of both the business and their foreign partner, and how they will maneuver to improve the terms of the deal for themselves. Having this knowledge certainly will not prevent conflict, but understanding what motivates the Chinese side, and having Hupert's advice on how to address Chinese concerns (most of which they will never verbally express) will equip Western business people far better than an entire lifetime of experience in a Western-only business setting.

This 10-chapter book is structured to mirror the life of a Chinese-Western partnership from beginning to end – whether that end is a continuance of the partnership or a dissolution. In each chapter, Hupert provides clear theoretical explanations of how and why Chinese and Western expectations differ, and then he provides case studies that illustrate both successful and unsuccessful ways of dealing with conflict.

There is also a larger, fictional case study about an American partner, Stan, and a Chinese partner, Jimmy who meet in college in the US and establish a business together in Shanghai. Each chapter ends with a telling of the portion of the Stan & Jimmy story that applies to that chapter, and the story is so well-told, that the reader will find it hard to stop reading at the end of any given chapter.

If you're serious about succeeding in business (or any kind of negotiation) in China, you really cannot afford not to have both of Andrew Hupert's books in your e-reader.
(reviewed long after purchase)

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