Veil

Rated 5.00/5 based on 1 reviews
After endowing humankind with the ability to perceive life through another's mind, Jin Tsay is murdered, so the military can possess his technology. Retribution comes in the form of his widow, who races to share her husband's invention with the world, before the military exploit it. Wielding the power of Veil, Suren Tsay hunts for the elusive killer of the father of the New Veil World, Jin Tsay. More

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Words: 201,710
Language: English
About Aaron Overfield

Apparently highly offensive but relatively easy on the eyes. He means everything he says, unless someone takes offense–in which case it was just a joke and perhaps they shouldn’t be so fucking uptight. He has a son, a lover, a mother, a father, sisters, brothers, good friends, a dog, and a foul mouth; therefore, he has all he needs. This is his first book, so he’s not entirely sure what he’s doing, but he gotsa liking for the story and the characters. His only hope is others do as well. If they don’t, fuck them. He never liked them anyway.

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Reviews

Review by: Sadie S. Forsythe on Nov. 22, 2012 :
When the Widow Tsay decides to avenge the death of her husband the world will never be the same. In telling her story Aaron Overfield's Veil presents a convincing and frightening vision of social evolution.

The absolute best part of this book is the way people relate to one another. Emotions aren't just surface decoration, but are all encompassing. People love with their whole heart and hate just as strongly. They also contradictorily treat each other with complete irreverence. They call each other nasty names and fling politically incorrect insults at one another, as only those most comfortable with each other can. Most of which is really funny. So are a lot of the author's interjections. While this makes the book a joy to read there really is a serious message here. What is the moral responsibility of science and scientists? What marks us out as individuals and how much of this is necessary to live appreciable human lives? Like Huxley or Orwell, Overfield forces the reader to imagine how dangerous it can be to give up too much of their autonomy, no matter how well-intentioned the organisation involved.

Despite the bold characters I wouldn't consider the book to be character driven (unless you consider Veil as a character). It tends to leap at regular intervals, leaving the main cast to age unobserved. Every time it did this I thought, 'no I want to know more about what happened next.' I was quickly engrossed in the next epoch of Veil, however, and forgot my disappointment.

The book is quite long and does tend to repeat itself. This might or might not be a purposeful attempt to remind the reader of earlier events. I don't know. Either way, while it is noticeable it isn't particularly distracting.

If you pick this one up I recommend reading all of the book, and by all of it I mean everything from the copyright page to the epilogue and beyond. It's worth it. (Not something I have cause to say often.)
(reviewed long after purchase)

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