Wheezer and the Shy Coyote

Rated 4.86/5 based on 8 reviews
As the People settled into Indian Territory, having survived the forced march, the disease ridden supplies and stolen food, a new and insidious enemy threatened them - an enemy in a jug.

Into this intrigue comes Coyote, half Lakota and half Blackfoot, forced to live on the fringe of society among his mother's people.

And what about Wheezer's new friend, a wild coyote Sasa calls Yellow Eyes? More

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Reviews

Review by: wistfulskimmie on April 13, 2013 :
This is the second in the series of books featuring Cherokee Sasa and her doggy friend Wheezer. This time they are trying to solve the mystery of who is selling whiskey to the Cherokees. With the help of Coyote, a half Lakota, half Blackfoot and a wild coyote Sasa has named Yellow eyes - it's not long before she finds herself over her head and in very real danger. With two Native Indians already dead, can Sasa and Wheezer solve the mystery before anymore lives are lost?

I really enjoyed the first Wheezer story and its follow-up was certainly no disappointment. It was nice meeting up with familiar characters, and Kitty truly does bring them to life in a wonderful way. Once again, this was a work of fiction but it has it's roots in real life history. it was easy to read and I got into the story very quickly. We were introduced to a few new characters this time around, and I do hope some of them find their way back again. The story itself was fast paced and hard to put down. Once I had started I found myself saying 'Just one more chapter....' I hope it won't be too long before we see Wheezer and Sasa again as I will be having withdrawal symptoms!
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Brian Hayden on April 09, 2013 :
"Wheezer and the Shy Coyote" is a fictional story written on a platform of historical non-fiction. The story begins in the present, as tourists explore an old fort museum at Fort Smith, Arkansas. During the exploration, and quite by accident, an artifact is discovered. As the guide explains the history of the artifact, the story unfolds in the 1840's, during a period called the "Whisky Wars". It is at this point of time, the story begins.

The American Indians, and in this story, the Cherokee people were moved from their lands, forced into slums and endured unspeakable conditions. Kitty Sutton is well researched on this topic. She uses historical fact and weaves it skillfully into her story. It is a history lesson, a love story and a story of how cruel some people can be.

The beginning of the story very nearly made me cry. Later, as the characters are introduced and the story-lines are defined,I found myself unable to stop reading. This is a book that must be read, and shared.

It is said, that to forget our mistakes from the past, destines us to repeat those mistakes in the future. Kitty Sutton tackled the daunting task of teaching us about our past mistakes, and doing it in a way that is informative and entertaining.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Lisa Day on March 29, 2013 :
Wheezer And The Shy Coyote by Kitty Sutton

This is the second book by Ms. Sutton I have read. For the second times she has managed to shared a story to keep our interest while educating us about a sad time in history.
As the story opens we are introduced to a coyote that happens to be at the wrong place at the wrong time. Soon, Ms. Sutton has us feeling in depth the confusion and sadness of loosing a life-long mate.

Sasa and Wheezer (the dog) don’t realized they are being watched, or should I say Sasa doesn’t realize. And so Ms. Sutton brings up us to date on the characters we met in her first book.

If I came call it, ‘fictionalized truth,’ we are entertained by the story. Yet we are or should be ashamed of the greed some people went to make a dollar at the expense of other people’s happiness or even their lives. While men in responsible places in history turned their backs.

Wheezer and The Shy Coyote is a love story, a suspenseful, educational and delightful tale, that should not be missed.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Lisa Day on March 29, 2013 : (no rating)
Wheezer And The Shy Coyote by Kitty Sutton
This is the second book by Ms. Sutton I have read. For the second times she has managed to shared a story to keep our interest while educating us about a sad time in history.
As the story opens we are introduced to a coyote that happens to be at the wrong place at the wrong time. Soon, Ms. Sutton has us feeling in depth the confusion and sadness of loosing a life-long mate.
Sasa and Wheezer (the dog) don’t realized they are being watched, or should I say Sasa doesn’t realize. And so Ms. Sutton brings up us to date on the characters we met in her first book.
If I came call it, ‘fictionalized truth,’ we are entertained by the story. Yet we are or should be ashamed of the greed some people went to make a dollar at the expense of other people’s happiness or even their lives. While men in responsible places in history turned their backs.
Wheezer and The Shy Coyote is a love story, a suspenseful, educational and delightful tale, that should not be missed.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Pico Triano on March 21, 2013 :
Kitty Sutton has done it again. Having read and enjoyed "Wheezer and the Painted Frog" I was expecting a great deal from her second book and was not disappointed. "Wheezer and the Shy Coyote" picks up where the first book left off. The survivors of the Trail of Tears and its immediate aftermath are now faced with The Whiskey Wars. It is a dark time for Native Americans and a historical black eye for anyone loving freedom and justice.

As in her first book Kitty's story revolves around most of the same characters: Sasa the young Cherokee girl who is learning all she can to be able to be a blessing for her own people. Medicine Man, Poison Woman, Jackson, Anna Edwards and of course Wheezer himself. Along the way, the reader will get wrapped up in the lives of these people and learn about this part of history without having to think about it. New characters like Coyote and Yellow Eyes add to the story. Their story comes to an exciting and satisfying conclusion within the historical context of the times.

This book is highly recommended. The research put into this book is clearly evident throughout and the story is well crafted. I look forward to the next one.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Greta Burroughs on March 11, 2013 :
I read "Wheezer and the Painted Frog" and had to start the second book "Wheezer and the Shy Coyote" the following day. The mistreatment of Native Americans is a black mark on our country that should never be forgotten. The greed, prejudice and torture of the People did not stop after they were driven from their homes to unfamiliar country. Whiskey became another weapon in the fight against the red man.

The author expresses the story in a way the reader can sympathize with the People's plight while including side stories of a budding romance, a two legged Coyote's quest for truth, and a four legged coyote's assistance in keeping Wheezer and Sasa safe from the bad guys.

It is evident that Kitty Sutton did a lot research before writing the Wheezer books. The story is a history lesson but is written in a way that is exciting and entertaining. I highly recommend the Wheezer books to everyone.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Alex Canton-Dutari on March 10, 2013 :
I used to think that I was a sensitive person that could control his outpour of emotions easily. This book proved me wrong, especially after having read the previous book by Kitty Sutton -- Wheezer and the Painted Frog.
The plight of the American Indian during their forced move to their government sponsored ghetto - concentration camp -- no other way to call it -- was very well conveyed. The use of alcohol to subdue this entire nation is well explained in the story, so much that it surpassed the love story involved.
A few words of interest: It is mentioned that a main character questioned the lack of tolerance of alcoholic beverages on the Indians. All Mongolic races have the same characteristic. The Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, just to name a few groups, have the same genetic disposition. We should remember that all Indians from the whole American Continent migrated from Mongolia to America through the Bering Straights. The Panamanian Indians cannot drink alcohol without becoming immediately depressed and suicidal in many cases.
The book is well-documented and written in a way that kept me wanting to read non-stop.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Linda Rae Blair on March 02, 2013 :
The author has taken us beyond the Trail of Tears, its torturous journey, starvation, death by the thousands, illness and degradation beyond our imagining. Now, the plot to keep desperately needed supplies from reaching those for whom the government intended, a new hell has overcome the People. Whiskey. The greed that drove the white man to decimate an entire people to get the land that was supposed to sustain them--but never could or would--continues. Now the weapon of choice is not as much starvation, while that is still being employed where it can be hidden, but death by alcohol. The People, once introduced to whiskey begin to destroy themselves. Wheezer and Sasa, with help from Jackson and his friends, step up to the plate once more. Obviously, since it is a battle still being fought in the 21st century, you, the reader, cannot expect a resolution to the real problem. However, Ms. Sutton has presented a very lively and entertaining and informative story of one more groups' attempt to destroy what will not go easily.

I look forward to more by Ms. Sutton. She tells an exquisite tale and teaches us without hitting us over the head. Reality does a good enough job of that, if we just bother to look!
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

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