My Troubles With Time

Rated 4.33/5 based on 5 reviews
An inept physics professsor travels back to December 1941 in his time machine. He seeks to become a national hero by destroying the Japanese fleet which attacked Pearl Harbor. He succeeds only to be sentenced to death by a U.S. Navy Courtmartial for mistakenly sinking the Japanese vessels prior to their attack. Thanks to the vagaries of time travel, he escapes and returns home greatly improved. More

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Words: 70,990
Language: English
ISBN: 9781452481883
About Benson Grayson

Benson Grayson served as a Foreign Service Officer of the State Department and then covered Washington, D.C. political and economic affairs as a reporter. He is the author of six published books on history and foreign affairs, including "Soviet Intentions and American Options in the Middle East," published by the National Defense University in 1982.

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Reviews

Review by: Christina Pope on May 23, 2013 : (no rating)
Benson Lee Grayson has definitely delivered a feel-good book in that of "My Troubles with Time". I immediately felt what the main character Maynard Snodgrass was feeling with the troubles he faced throughout his life of just simply blending into the background.

With his spectacular knowledge of physics, Maynard built a working time machine and made his plans to live out some of his dreams. In doing so, a few things went awry and so ensues an amazing journey.

I absolutely loved the way the character development unfolded throughout and with an ending that truly leaves you feeling completely satisfied and I even had a smile on my face. The ending, for me, was perfect.

In reading one of Benson's other books, "Lust Takes the White House" I went out in search of more and this one was even better than I had anticipated. I am quite a fan of Benson's writing and will definitely be reading more of his books.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Christina Pope on May 23, 2013 : (no rating)
Benson Lee Grayson has definitely delivered a feel-good book in that of "My Troubles with Time". I immediately felt what the main character Maynard Snodgrass was feeling with the troubles he faced throughout his life of just simply blending into the background.

With his spectacular knowledge of physics, Maynard built a working time machine and made his plans to live out some of his dreams. In doing so, a few things went awry and so ensues an amazing journey.

I absolutely loved the way the character development unfolded throughout and with an ending that truly leaves you feeling completely satisfied and I even had a smile on my face. The ending, for me, was perfect.

In reading one of Benson's other books, "Lust Takes the White House" I went out in search of more and this one was even better than I had anticipated. I am quite a fan of Benson's writing and will definitely be reading more of his books.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Lis Carey on Sep. 15, 2011 :
When Maynard Snodgrass's mother drops him off, at age seven, at an orphanage, the other kids quickly nickname him "Nerdly." It's not kind, but it is true. With looks plain enough to be boring and not ugly enough to be interesting, an excellent brain, and a self-effacing personality, Maynard evokes either complete disinterest, or a certain amount of resentment because it's just human nature to resent those you take advantage of. And Maynard gets taken advantage of a lot, because he doesn't have the confidence to say no. It's still happening when he's an assistant professor of physics at Miles Standish University, writing the department chair's papers and getting no publication credit, and not even getting tenure. So he pursues a dream, and invents a time machine.

He decides to make a quick test trip to the US Civil War, and bring back a photograph of himself with several Union officers to prove he's made the trip. Other people might realize that more than one person can buy a replica Civil War uniform, but that would involve the people skills that poor Maynard, as smart, kind, and well-intentioned as he is, just doesn't have. Unfortunately, he goes wildly off-course geographically, and winds up in Paris in 1870 rather than near a major Union Army encampment in 1863. He's in the middle of the German siege of Paris, and he knows no German and very little French. But, determined only to protect his time machine and his ability to get home, he's sufficiently forceful that he rallies a small unit of the French National Guard, achieves a small local victory, and finds himself the welcome guest of senior French officers. Surrounded by people who think he's a successful American military officer who served in the U.S. Civil War, rather than by people who know he's an ineffectual, easily-exploited physics professor, he finds a confidence and decisiveness he hasn't experienced before, and starts to wonder if he's really the worthless creature he's always thought himself.

Once he gets safely home, he finds himself getting kicked around again, even by his cat. His attempt to convince the National Physics Society that he's invented a working time machine go about as well as you'd expect, and everything goes downhill from there.

What he does next is even nuttier, has even reason to be successful, and plays out in ways that are as unexpected for the reader as for Maynard, despite the fact that we and he have quite different expectations. Saying anymore would be a spoiler, so I'll limit myself to this: There's too much wish-fulfillment here, but it's nicely-plotted, fast-paced, and funny. Not belly-laughs funny, but you'll smile through much of the book. Maynard is likable to begin with, and he learns quite a bit from his experiences. There's a bit at the end where I'd have liked to have seen an editor slap Grayson's hands and make him fix it, but this really is an enjoyable book, and I'll look forward to seeing more from him.

Recommended.
(reviewed the day of purchase)

Review by: Tim Tierney on Sep. 03, 2011 :
This book was fantastic! Although it is an exciting work of fiction, the historical events that take place in the book were well researched, and the writing is both intelligent and quite entertaining. The author does a brilliant job of bringing the main character to life and holding the reader's attention the entire book.

I have to admit, I'm not the type of person who usually reads science fiction. However, I do enjoy a good alternate history book now and then. Well, it turns out that the two mesh very well together because this was one of the best books I have read in a very long time.

If you're the type of person that enjoys reading books and watching movies about alternate histories, then I highly recommend that you read this book. You will not be disappointed!
(reviewed the day of purchase)

Review by: Matt Kelland on Sep. 02, 2011 :
I've always enjoyed time travel stories, particularly those with a good dose of comedy. if you take it too seriously, it's easy to get lost in paradoxes and quantum something-or-others, and get tangled up in the science, but if you just want to throw your characters around in time and have crazy adventures, you can have a lot of fun. This book is very much in the vein of old-school sci-fi stories such as Harry Harrison's Technicolor Time Machine, H. Beam Piper's Paratime Police, or some of Robert Silverberg's tongue-in-cheek novels. Not to give away too much of the story, it's almost a comedy version of The Final Countdown, that 80s movie with Kirk Douglas and Martin Sheen.

The opening's a little slow, but the story romps along at a good pace once the time travel gets going. It's well-written and easy to read, and is sure to please fans of the genre. Well worth $3!
(reviewed the day of purchase)

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