Ascraeus Press

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Ascraeus Press

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Blue Sunset
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 36,080. Language: American English. Published: March 17, 2012 by Ascraeus Press. Categories: Fiction » Poetry » Themes & motifs, Fiction » Science fiction » Space opera
(5.00)
Blue Sunset looks back on the first settlers on Mars. Their triumphs and failures, their loves and losses. Earth sent the good and the bad, the thoughtful and the clueless, the doers and the quitters, the lovers and the leaders, the vigilantes and the virtuous. The red planet changed them. Their epitaphs tell their stories while the universe has the initial last word on this first settlement.


Ascraeus Press’s tag cloud

blue sunset    epitaphs    mars    mars poems    poems    science fiction   

Smashwords book reviews by Ascraeus Press

  • Dog-Nabbed on March 19, 2015

    "Dognabbed", the wonderful successor to Susan J. Kroupa's "Bed-Bugged" and "Out-Sniffed", is again warmhearted and funny but never superficial. Middle-grade kids will love it; older kids will enjoy it secretly, without perhaps ever admitting that they read it. Adults with the good fortune of having a dog in their lives will adore the book; adults without canine companionship will start wondering if they need a labradoodle. Book three stands on its own, but lucky readers will want to read books one and two as soon as possible. In "Dognabbed", main character Doodle, the bedbug-detecting labradoodle "employee" of Josh Hunter and companion to Josh's 10-year-old daughter Molly, again grasps every situation immediately, his wry assessments of human behavior spot on the money. Adult human beings in the story stumble cluelessly and then fail to repair their regrettable mistakes. Children are imaginative and flexible enough to think outside any box and come up with obvious solutions which of course succeed, once the adults are willing to try them. Over Thanksgiving on a trip to the Blue Ridge Mountains Molly has an opportunity to get to know more of her mother's side of the family while her father has to deal with challenges on his side. Molly is also confronted with serious family problems a friend of hers has. Doodle loves the woodsy environment, even giving in to a puppylike desire to chase wild turkeys. In the end, thanks to Molly and Doodle, situations are resolved with solutions acceptable to all, except perhaps the villains who don't deserve any better. The reader's sense of justice is not disappointed. Adults' bad choices are presented objectively but compassionately, and of course Molly and Doodle know what has to be done to remedy sad situations. This is a marvelous book. Buy it, read it, and then buy another one so that someone else can enjoy it as much as you did.