Ubiquitous Bubba

Biography

Ubiquitous Bubba (if that's his real name) spends a significant amount of time surrounded by imaginary characters from bizarre universes. He's been known to hold conversations with animals, inanimate objects, and food. These discussions frequently diverge into philosophy, speculations on Reality/Unreality, and the proper role of cheese in society.

Growing up in Texas, he studied the lore of the Storyteller, the mysterious art of the tall tale, and the pervasive universal existence of Bubbas. They're everywhere. As he wandered universes, he discovered that there's always a Bubba around when you need one.

Ubiquitous is also a drummer, who has somewhat narrow and specialized musical tastes. A fan of progressive and hard rock styles, he's also known to incorporate some funk just to keep himself entertained.

Ubiquitous Bubba enjoys relaxing at home with his wife and kids. He enjoys telling stories, eating pizza, and holding the recliner down. It hasn't gotten away yet, but one can't be too careful.

Smashwords Interview

Where did you grow up, and how did this influence your writing?
I spent my childhood in a hot, refried land known as Texas. My extended family members were storytellers in a grand Southern tradition. We spent many hours retelling and embellishing old stories which were based (sometimes loosely) on actual events. My grandmother's stories were loud, dramatic, and exciting tales that focused on the freakishly insane actions of other people. While she would frown at the suggestion that her version of events was exaggerated in any way, the truth grew stretch marks. My grandfather, on the other hand, was a different breed of storyteller. His tales would wander slowly, turning to look closer at any interesting detail on the way, disappearing down unfamiliar trails, circling in seemingly random directions, stopping to delve into the backstory of every minor character, and exploring the universe with childlike wonder.

Several other family members all had their unique styles as well. We would tell stories for hours at a time. Sometimes, a story would begin that we had heard dozens of times before, but we'd listen anyway. We knew every line, gesture, and expression, but we laughed anyway. There were times we could hardly breathe because we were laughing so hard.

I started learning to read when I was two years old. I was just bored. By first grade, I was reading fifth grade books. We would pull up to the library each week, drag in my box of books to return, and then fill it up with more. I couldn't read enough fantasy, sci-fi, or speculative fiction.

As a result, I grew to love humorous fantasy/sci-fi. When I write, I hear the voices of storytellers from my youth. I see their legacy in my writing and in my characters. I hear their laughter, exclamations, and accents in the background.
When did you first start writing?
I wrote numerous short stories in my elementary school years (ages 6 - 11). To me, the written story was only part of the fun. The real fun began with reading the story aloud to an audience. I always loved to perform and that fact concealed my love of writing. Whenever anyone would ask me what I wanted to be when I grew up, I would start with playing drums, performing (literally doing anything on a stage), and then writing.

I had a history report I had to write in junior high school that I almost failed. I wrote about John Paul Jones (Revolutionary War, not Led Zeppelin) from the perspective of his ship's rat. My teacher thought I was mocking him. (I wasn't...) I wrote many other short stories in high school and college. I wrote an utterly horrific, stream of (un)consciousness story in college as a non-credit side project that was around 50 pages long. My English teacher liked it and encouraged me to continue to write. Even though it was not in my major, I took a Creative Writing course in my senior year that changed my interest in writing.

My Creative Writing teacher challenged me in a big way. I learned more in that one class about the art of writing than I thought possible. In the end, she told me that I needed to write in order to fulfil my purpose on this planet. I thought she was pushing it a bit.
Read more of this interview.

Where to find Ubiquitous Bubba online


Where to buy in print


Books

Humanity Was Delicious
By
Price: Free! Words: 9,850. Language: American English. Published: September 25, 2014. Category: Fiction » Humor & comedy » General
(5.00)
Imagine you are the werewolf who ate the last human. What will you eat now? More importantly, how are you going to get off this alien ship?
The Imaginary Invasion
By
Price: Free! Words: 11,350. Language: American English. Published: September 24, 2014. Category: Fiction » Humor & comedy » General
(4.50)
When our reality is invaded by extra-dimensional beings, imaginary characters may be humanity’s only hope.
Reality Challenged
By
Series: The Other Universes, Book 1. Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 99,120. Language: English. Published: December 5, 2012. Category: Fiction » Humor & comedy » General
(4.67)
Someone may have infiltrated the Prime Universe in order to conquor the Multiverse. It's up to a psionic girl and her bizarre companions to stop them. It might help if they knew what they were doing. This humorous sci-fi adventure is the first book of The Other Universes series.

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Smashwords book reviews by Ubiquitous Bubba

  • The Battle of Chibi on June 28, 2013

    The Battle of Chibi may appear at first to be a daunting read, but it is well worth the effort. The book offers an abridged version of The Romance of the Three Kingdoms. For those who are not acquainted with this revered saga, The Battle of Chibi is an excellent introduction. The introductory sections of the book are extremely helpful to readers who are unfamiliar with the story or the culture. The reading advice presented here is excellent and helps to make the entire book more accessible. The Battle of Chibi is well written, presenting not only the actions of warriors but insight into the culture and thoughts of those involved. This is not just a story of war. It is a tale of honor, betrayal, strategy, heroism, love and sacrifice. The characters are shrouded in legend and myth, but they are still intrinsically human. Readers who are not accustomed to this type of literature may have difficulty at first with making sense of the seemingly unending battles, beheadings, plots and characters. In the end, persistence pays off. The story unfolds and primary figures emerge. To me, the story became intriguing when master strategists matched wits. Those who enjoy tales of schemes within plots veiled in subterfuge will love this book. A complimentary copy of this book was received in exchange for a non-reciprocal review.