Rebecca Douglass

Biography

Rebecca Douglass mostly resides in Daly City, California, with her husband and two teenaged sons. Her imagination resides where it pleases, in and out of this world. After a decade of working at the library, she is still learning the secrets of the Ninja Librarian.

Smashwords Interview

Where did you grow up, and how did this influence your writing?
I grew up on Vashon Island, in Washington State. The Island was semi-rural, which meant that my friends lived too far away to just run over and visit. Since you can't always play with older brothers (though I certainly tried, and was a terrific tomboy!), I had a lot of time to fill on my own. I discovered books and the library early, and developed a passion for reading that has served me well all my life. Anyone who wants to write would do well to have been an avid reader as a child!
When did you first start writing?
I began writing stories as soon as I learned to write at all. I can remember in fourth grade writing writing an on-going saga of my future life raising horses and writing books. I believe I was actually turning in weekly installments as part of our writing assignments for class, though I have no idea if we were meant to be writing fiction.
Read more of this interview.

Where to find Rebecca Douglass online


Where to buy in print


Books

Death By Ice Cream
By Rebecca Douglass
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 87,120. Language: American English. Published: March 20, 2014. Category: Fiction
(5.00 from 1 review)
Pismawallops Island is a Puget Sound paradise. . . until the local gadfly shows up dead. Then JJ MacGregor finds out just what she’ll do for the PTA, even while she has to deal with a teenaged son, a Yearbook deadline, and a serious crush on the local police chief.
Return to Skunk Corners
By Rebecca Douglass
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 56,380. Language: English. Published: August 14, 2013. Category: Fiction
When Big Al wakes up one morning and finds the Ninja Librarian has left town, everything seems to go wrong. And just about the time she’s thinking maybe the town can cope after all, he comes back. After that, it’s business as usual in Skunk Corners: bad guys, irritated skunks, and crises big and small that require the Librarian’s unique brand of outside-the-box thinking and direct action.
A is for Alpine: An Alphabet Book for Little Hikers
By Rebecca Douglass
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 510. Language: American English. Published: May 21, 2013. Category: Nonfiction
(5.00 from 1 review)
A fun ABC book for outdoor kids and their parents, A Is For Alpine is meant to help children (and their parents) imagine themselves hiking, camping and backpacking.
The Ninja Librarian
By Rebecca Douglass
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 38,380. Language: English. Published: March 13, 2012. Category: Fiction
(4.00 from 2 reviews)
The Ninja Librarian is a humorous set of tall tales set in the highly fictional gold-country town of Skunk Corners. It’s the story of a dusty, tough, unfriendly town that gets a new outlook on life thanks to the advent of the Ninja Librarian—a mild-mannered librarian who offers his wisdom with a little extra when folks don’t listen.

Rebecca Douglass’s tag cloud


Smashwords book reviews by Rebecca Douglass

  • Redtooth on March 25, 2012
    star star star
    An entertaining bit of science fiction. The writing style seemed a bit rough to me, and I admit I was taken by surprise--I missed the bit about it being a short story, and expected more. But overall I'd say it worked pretty well.
  • Looking Back with a Smile on Oct. 16, 2012
    star star star star
    Edward Farber's Looking Back with a Smile is a quick and fun read. Mr. Farber has taken the idea of a memoir in a slightly different direction, not trying to create any particular significance out of his life, but looking back and picking out the bits that make him smile, and that he thinks would do the same for the reader. The result is a rather episodic construction of a life lived through a good chunk of the 20th Century, both personal and nostalgic. A quick and easy read at only 89 pages, LBWS offers both a fun glimpse into how our country was at different periods during the last 70 years, but also a reminder that we all have stories to tell. That, in fact, is largely the point of the work: to share the little stories that otherwise get lost, and to encourage his readers to do the same, even if only to share with their families. In a way, what Mr. Farber has done reminds me of the NPR feature "Story Corps," where they get "ordinary" people to record conversations with a loved one, recalling some significant event or element of their history and relationship. In the end, none of the people seem so ordinary after all. The tone of the book is that of oral history, reminiscing around the fire on a winter night, and a reminder that all our lives are significant. That the tone works is a tribute to Mr. Farber's skill in selecting and presenting the incidents he recounts. Occasionally, I wish he'd tell a little more, follow up a bit on what happened next. Most most of the time I could just smile and move on to the next little episode. LBWS isn't great literature. But it's a nice bit of entertainment you can read in an hour or so, or you can (as I did) dip into an episode or two at a time until suddenly you find yourself (alas) in the 21st Century. I give Mr. Farber 4 stars, because he did what he set out to and did it well.
  • Ginnie Dare: Crimson Sands on Jan. 14, 2013
    star star star star
    I received a review copy of Ginnie Dare last week, and being in need of a good middle grade read, jumped right in. Mr. Roche has written an engaging work of science fiction for the middle grade reader, and I will be reading the sequel. Despite advance notice in the form of some comments in the book's information, it took me a while to figure out why the name "Ginnie (Virginia) Dare" seemed familiar. Mr. Roche has taken inspiration from the story of the Lost Colony of Roanoke, VA, and named his main character after a girl from that colony (I think "inspiration" is the best way to put it--this is far from a retelling of the story). Ginnie is the 13-year-old (?) communications officer on her father's interplanetary merchant ship, and is definitely smart and able beyond her years. This may require a certain willing suspension of disbelief, but I consider that pretty normal for young heroes, and Roche carries it off convincingly. Ginnie is by turns over-confident and painfully aware of and/or annoyed by her own youth and inexperience. When the Dare Company ship Helena arrives at the planet Eshu, they can't find the colonists. What they do about it and how Ginnie manages to negotiate between the natives, the military, and a crew of pirates drives the story. The story caught me up pretty well by about the mid-point, but I did feel it was a little slow to start. In part, I was put off by a font that didn't work well on my Nook, resulting in text that was jammed together and a little hard to read. That is minor and Mr. Roche is working on it. But the story doesn't really take off in any case until the military shows up and there is some conflict to offset the original mystery. The mystery presenting itself without anything concrete to be done resulted in too much thinking and not enough action (though of course in life more thinking and less action is often a better choice, I find this is not really true in the first chapters of a book). If I were just rating Ginnie Dare on the second half, I would give it four stars, free and clear. The slow beginning, however, leads me to knock it down to three and a half stars. An impatient 11-year-old might put it down before getting to the heart of the adventure, but continued reading will be rewarded.