Vicki Tyley

Biography

Based in rural Victoria, Australia, I write fast-paced mystery and suspense novels in contemporary Australian settings.

My other interests include photography and web design.

I love to hear from readers: vickityley@gmail.com

Where to find Vicki Tyley online


Books

Two Birds (A Short Mystery)
By
Price: Free! Words: 6,850. Language: English. Published: January 21, 2013. Category: Fiction » Mystery & detective » Short Stories
(4.67)
A short mystery from the bestselling author of THIN BLOOD. Kristine Abbey lies unconscious and bleeding on her kitchen floor. Crouched next to her with his hands clamped over the knife wound in her abdomen, her husband, Daniel, screams at the couple’s sister-in-law – and his ex-mistress – rooted in the doorway. Time slips away… 3,300 words
Bitter Nothings
By
Price: $1.49 USD. Words: 72,060. Language: English. Published: November 17, 2012. Category: Fiction » Mystery & detective » Women Sleuths
(5.00)
Half her family have been murdered in their beds. Her father is the prime suspect. And things are about to get a whole lot worse… Graphic designer Dervla Johns wakes one morning to the news that her father, Warren, is missing and her stepmother and step-siblings were found dead in their beds. While the police hunt for Warren, Dervla searches for answers. Could her father really be a killer?
Sleight Malice
By
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 78,860. Language: English. Published: August 12, 2010. Category: Fiction » Mystery & detective » Women Sleuths
(4.83)
One cold Melbourne winter's night a suburban bungalow goes up in flames. When a badly charred body is discovered in the remains, web designer Desley James is devastated. That’s until she learns the unidentified male body is not that of her friend and her husband. Not realising until it's almost too late what some people will do to cover their tracks, Desley teams up with private investigator...

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Smashwords book reviews by Vicki Tyley

  • Xenolith on April 06, 2010

    Tight writing (especially at the start) and a particularly strong sense of place drew me into this story. Frank’s strength of character, despite his heart problems, carried me through to the end. (4.5/5) Multiple plotlines and points of view keep the interest high, moving the story forward at all times. (4.5/5) I only have one quibble and it’s minor. Because I was most vested in Frank’s storyline and finding out what happened to his wife, the ending was left a bit too much up in the air for me. I wanted to know more! With a sequel in the wings, I realise this was probably intentional. :) Overall, a thoroughly enjoyable read.
  • Days' End on July 10, 2010

    What would happen if advanced DNA splicing and cloning techniques fell into the wrong hands? Headhunted for a project she knows little about, scientist Nysa becomes an unwitting accessory. Days' End is a fast and compelling read with a shocking but satisfying ending. This is probably just me, but it took me a little while to work out what the POV/first person switch at the end of the early chapters was all about. It didn't detract from the story, though, and overall it was a most enjoyable read, not to mention excellent value.
  • The Skull Ring on July 19, 2010

    When she was four year old, Julia Stone's father disappeared. Now an adult, dark childhood memories continue to haunt her. "...everybody knew that monsters weren't real." Everybody except Julia. Scott Nicholson's strong and vivid writing draws the reader deep into the story, but it's the writer's deft handling of pace that makes this a winner for me. As the tension ramped up, I often found myself holding my breath. Yet at other times, I couldn't help but smile at the gems of understated humor. The Skull Ring is a chilling, suspense-filled psychological thriller that will stay with me for a long time to come. Highly recommended. I look forward to reading more from this author.
  • Fairy Tale Fail on Aug. 10, 2010

    Restless Ellie is always looking for excitement and her own fairy tale. Not surprising then that her hobby is researching and planning travel/trips abroad. I enjoyed this novella. It’s not a “girly” romance but it is an easy read. While there were times I would’ve liked to have shaken Ellie, her blinkered outlook added to the characterisation. Set in Manila, the story also gives a glimpse into another culture. I learned a few Filipino terms like “barkada” and “kuya” that I hadn’t come across before. Recommended for anyone looking for a quick, entertaining read.
  • 33 A.D. on Aug. 10, 2010

    With its blend of vampires, horror and religion, this book was so far out of my comfort zone, I thought I might never find my way back. Because of that, it took me a little while to become immersed in the story. If it had been a film I was watching, there would’ve been plenty of occasions I would’ve closed my eyes – that’s only because I’m a wimp. I am no judge on what makes a good horror novel, but I do recognise excellent writing when I see it. McAfee’s writing is polished, the story well structured and there’s a strong sense of place and time. But more than all that, it’s compelling reading. Impressive. Highly recommended.
  • PORTAL (Portal Chronicles Book One) on Sep. 23, 2010

    Arizona Stevens lives with her father while she finishes high school. Her sister lives with their mother on the other side of the country. Or at least that’s how it was before she fell asleep in 2009 and woke in 2008 in her mother’s car in an alternate life… As a general rule I don’t read YA novels, but as with all rules, there are exceptions. Portal is that. Whilst I can’t comment on the authenticity of the story’s teenage characters, the premise is intriguing and Rose’s engaging writing style kept me turning the pages. An excellent debut. Highly recommended for fans of teenage romance and time travel.
  • Maisy May on Sep. 29, 2010

    I was hooked from the disclaimer at the front: “This book contains profanity, violence toward bagsnatchers, religious discussions which don't necessarily conclude with 'and of course the bible's always right, as is the church', moral judgments, teen sex, gay relationships, and - possibly worst of all - Australian spelling and slang…” This novella was so different to anything I’ve ever read. It was right out there, raw and real. Maisy May is a straight-talking tough nut, loyal as she is outspoken. I loved both her voice and the story. Bloody brilliant as we Aussies say…
  • Primal Wound on Dec. 12, 2010

    When Cicely Scott’s father needs a kidney transplant, she doesn’t hesitate to offer one of hers. Except, as she soon discovers, he’s not her biological father. Cicely’s life is thrown into turmoil as, desperate to connect with her “real” family, she stalks a woman who wants nothing to do with her. Francisco weaves a compelling, multi-faceted psychological tale of deceit, insanity and murder. A story so full of twists, the twists even have twists. I had a hard time putting this book down. Ruth Francisco has a new fan.
  • Fatherly Love on Jan. 01, 2011

    “Australia was a big place, and there were ways of losing yourself if you had a mind to.” – Fatherly Love Construction millionaire Miller Turnbull hires ex- newspaper reporter Nat Barker to find his missing daughter. Turnbull and his daughter had been estranged for ten years, but he’d managed to at least keep track of her. That’s until his wife died. I thoroughly enjoyed this short hardboiled mystery, reading it in one sitting. Wallace wastes no words, the result being a taut, edgy story that suits the genre so well. Ditto the flawed, tough (on the outside) main character. I look forward to reading more from B.A. Wallace.
  • The Other Boyfriend on Jan. 01, 2011

    “You want me to help you find a boyfriend for your lover’s partner?” – The Other Boyfriend You can’t help whom you fall in love with. Unfortunately for Sarah Jamison, she’s fallen for Jeffrey Williams, a man who is not only married to his job but is already in a relationship. With the help of her best friend, Monica, Sarah hatches a plot to get Jeffrey all to herself that involves finding a boyfriend for her lover’s partner. The Other Boyfriend is a light-hearted, entertaining read but also quite sad. Maybe sad because I’ve had friends throw away their prime years on married men. That aside, though, Massara crafts an engaging story – one with a moral. I liked the character of Sarah (except when I wanted to shake her) and her fetish for throwing imaginary ashtrays and also that she was older than your average chick-lit heroine. Jeffrey, I wanted to… well, I’ll leave that up to your imagination. Highly recommended.
  • We Interrupt This Date on March 06, 2011

    Divorcee Susan Caraway always seems to be at the beck and call of her domineering mother and her “poor me” sister. Then there’s her spoiled son who thinks it only just that his mother take on a second job, so he can enjoy college life without working himself. Trying to be all things to all people, Susan’s pushed to breaking point… We Interrupt This Date is a fast, fun and entertaining read. Evans’ writing style is fluid, the prose polished. Rom-com is not my preferred genre, but when I reached the last page, I was actually disappointed there wasn’t more. A thoroughly enjoyable book. I look forward to reading more from this author.
  • A Shocking Exhibition! on May 24, 2011

    From the opening sentence - Someone famous once said, "When you're tired of London, you're tired of life." - I was hooked. A SHOCKING EXHIBITION! is a fast, entertaining, racy and, above all else, fun read. It's packed with so many laugh-out-loud moments, I wouldn't recommend anyone reading it in public. And the author's colourful turn of phrase brings the story to life. How can it not with gems like this: "...in a puff of Lynx deodorant." "...granny-like age of thirty-bloody-four." "...loud snorking from a boyfriend-shaped duvet mountain." Simply a delightful book.
  • What You Remember I Did on July 09, 2011

    The controversial subject – repressed memories – and writing style of What You Remember I Did put me in mind of Jodi Picoult. It’s one of those books that stays with you even when you’re not reading it. I often found myself during the day thinking about the story and characters. The portrayal of the elderly Catherine, especially, touched me. It was also refreshing to have a lead character in the prime of her life. Nan Jenssen, a mother and grandmother herself, is her elderly mother’s caregiver.
  • Widow's Tale on Feb. 15, 2012

    This is the fourth Maureen Miller novel I’ve read, so I knew before I even started what to expect. And I wasn’t disappointed. Widow’s Tale is a fast-paced, easy read that I found hard to put down (I read it in two sittings). For me, the author’s strengths are her sense of place – I felt as if I was right there on the rugged cliffs of Maine – and her fine balance of mystery and romance/sexual tension. Highly recommended.
  • Bird of Paradise: A Diana Siddal and Mustapha Alawi Mystery Short on March 03, 2013

    “He doesn't get his hands dirty—but he's ruined a lot of people, some of whom may not have even deserved it.” – Bird of Paradise An entertaining quick read and my introduction to Cage's Detective Diana Siddal and Inspector Mustapha Alawi. The writing is fluid and concise, the characters interesting and not run of the mill. For me, it was a tad churchy, but not so much as to deter from the story. I'd certainly read more of Cage’s work.
  • Jacob's Closet on Aug. 16, 2014

    I read and enjoyed all Jeff McDargh's Maple Drive series shorts plus the Anniversary flash fiction (my favourite of the four). The writing in all is strong with no wasted words, yet McDargh manages to pack a lot in. McDargh's strength is in the storytelling. All the stories, however, could do with some editing. The missing punctuation and the few typos weren't so much, though, as to detract from the story.
  • Love & Secrets on Aug. 16, 2014

    I read and enjoyed all Jeff McDargh's Maple Drive series shorts plus the Anniversary flash fiction (my favourite of the four). The writing in all is strong with no wasted words, yet McDargh manages to pack a lot in. McDargh's strength is in the storytelling. All the stories, however, could do with some editing. The missing punctuation and the few typos weren't so much, though, as to detract from the story.
  • The Unnamed on Aug. 16, 2014

    I read and enjoyed all Jeff McDargh's Maple Drive series shorts plus the Anniversary flash fiction (my favourite of the four). The writing in all is strong with no wasted words, yet McDargh manages to pack a lot in. McDargh's strength is in the storytelling. All the stories, however, could do with some editing. The missing punctuation and the few typos weren't so much, though, as to detract from the story.
  • Anniversary on Aug. 16, 2014

    I read and enjoyed all Jeff McDargh's Maple Drive series shorts plus the Anniversary flash fiction (my favourite of the four). The writing in all is strong with no wasted words, yet McDargh manages to pack a lot in. McDargh's strength is in the storytelling. All the stories, however, could do with some editing. The missing punctuation and the few typos weren't so much, though, as to detract from the story.